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FAiRFiELD mHrnm 



fahfield 

university 




1073 North Benson Road 
Fairfield, Connecticut 06430 
Tel: 203.254.4000 
www.fairfield.edu 

Volume 52 



1 

title page 




1 . This statue stands among the 

trees as one of many reminders of 

the school's Jesuit background and 

presence 2. Bellarmine Pond in 

the Fall 3. The newly renovated 

DiMenna-Nyselius Library 

4. Loyola Hall, one of the residence 

buildings located in the quad 5. 

The statue of St. Francis out in front 

of the chapel 



The Ever-Changing Fairfield Campus 



"One never reaches home, but wlierever 
friendly paths intersect the whole world 
looks like home for a time." 

-Hermann Hesse 




/'/«// /o /as/ 




THE FOUNDATION OF FAIRFIELD 

by Laura Pfiefer 



As the Fairfield University 
campus is becoming a magnet of 
constant change, the heart and care 
of Jesuit beliefs remain a stable 
force amidst the backdrop of 
Fairfield's evolution. Renovations 
and constant construction, 
technology and tragedy, scandal and 
scare, cannot alter the mission 
statement written in 1942: 




Fairfield University, founded 
by tiie Society of Jesus, is a 
coeducational institution of tiigher 
learning whose primary objectives 
are to develop the creative 
intellectual potential of its students 
and to foster in them ethical and 
religious values and a sense of 
social responsibility. Jesuit 
Education, which began in 1547, is 
committed today to the service of 
faith, of which the promotion of 
justice is an absolute requirement. 




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Nature has no mercy at all. 
Nature says, "I'm going to 
snow . If you have on a bikini 
and no snowshoes, that's tough. 
1 am going to snow anyway." - 
Maya Angelou 




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NTRODUCTION 



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A Fairfield education is a 
liberal education, characterized by 
its breadth and depth. It offers 
opportunities for individual and 
common reflection, and it provides 
training in such essential human 
skills as analysis, syntheses, and 
communication. The liberally 
educated person is able to 
assimilate and organize facts, to 
evaluate knowledge, to identify 
issues, to use appropriate methods 
of reasoning and to convey 
conclusions persuasively in v\/ritten 
and spoken word. Equally essential 
to liberal education is the 
development of the esthetic 
dimension of human nature, the 
power to imagine, to intuit, to create, 



and to appreciate. In its fullest sense 
liberal education initiates students 
at a mature level into their culture, 
its past, its present and it future. 

Fairfield has a further 
obligation to the wider community of 
which it is a part, to share with its 
neighbors its resources and its 
special expertise for the betterment 
of the community as a whole. Faculty 
and students are encouraged to 
participate in the larger community 
through service and academic 
activities. But most of all, Fairfield 
serves the wider community by 
educating it students to be socially 
aware and morally responsible 
persons. 



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''May soft be the grass you walk on, 
May fair be the skies above you. 
May true be the joys that surround you. 

May dear be the hearts that love you." 
-Traditional Irish Blessing 



Bright colors and beautiful scenes can be found everywhere 




1 . Scenery down by the Dolan 
School of Business 2. Grauert 
Field on North Benson Road 
3. The hidden beauty of the serene 
Japanese gardens, located near 
Bellarmine Hall 4. Aviewof Egan 
Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola, which 
serves the Fairfield students and the 
outside community 



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/;///// to last 



"By building relations... We create a source of love 
and personal pride and belonging that makes living in 
a chaotic w orld easier." -Susan Lieberman 



These are the days to rememeber, cuz they will not last forever 




1 . The entry way to the DiMenna- 

Nyselius Library 2. Night falling on 

the new Barone Campus center. 

A place for concerts, gatherings, or 

just hanging out 3. Dolan Hall, a 

view many have never seen, hidden 

away behind the athletic fields 4. 

The back of Bellarmine Hall, where 

each student begins and ends his 

career at Fairfield 5. Two of the 

many colorful Monk parakeets that 

you can constantly hear around 

campus squawking 



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"Change your opinions, 
keep to your principles; 
change your leaves, 
keep intact your roots." 

-Victor Hugo 



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INTRODUCTION 



Fairfield University values 
each of its students as an individual 
with unique abilities and potentials, 
and it respects the personal and 
academic freedom of all its 
members. At the same time it seeks 
to develop a greater sense of 
community within itself, a sense that 
all of its members belong to and are 
involved in the University, sharing 
common goals and a common 
commitment to truth and justice, and 
manifesting in their lives the 
common concern for others which is 
the obligation of all educated, 



mature human beings. You 

don't have to look hard to find the 
beauty at Fairfield, whether it's in the 
landscape or architecture. It also 
extends further than the eye, into the 
character of the students, faculty, 
and administration that create the 
university's community. The campus 
is always busy with these students 
walking to classes, meeting friends, 
or relaxing in the quad. A friendly 
"hi" and smile from even people you 
don't know give you the sense of 
belonging to something more. 



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"College should give ihem 

insight into the things of the 

mind and the spirit ... the 

consciousness of having taken 

on them the vows of true 

enlightenment and of having 

undergone the discipline, never 

to be shaken off, of those who 

seek wisdom in candor, with 

faithful labor and travail of 

spirit." -Woodrow Wilson 




pride and spirit 

1 TMTPrAnT irr 



INTRODUCTION 



FAIRFIELD STAGS IN ACTION 

by Rebecca Young 



Fairfield University's many 
athletes have pride in calling 
themselves "Stags." Their 
dedication and hard work are 
continuous, striving for excellence 
and the win, whether if s on the court, 
the field, or in the pool. Teammates 
have the chance to form tight bonds 
of friendship from practicing, 
training, playing, traveling, and 
partying together. These memories 
that athletes take away will last a 
lifetime. 

Power, grace, speed, and 
strength are just a few 
characteristics that Fairfield athletes 



build. But Fairfield is not only 
building these men and women for 
competition on the field but also in 
the real world. They are able to take 
away skills and an attitude that can 
aid them in accomplishing everyday 
goals. 

Even if they weren't a varsity 
athlete, most students can look back 
on their four years here and have 
some great memories of cheering 
on their friends, participating in 
intermurals, getting together at the 
gym, or just horsing around in the 
quad. 



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1 . A few of the field hockey players 
watching their teammates out on the 
turf 2. A mingling crowd during 
halftime at the alumni weekend 
football game 3. Our cheerleaders 
rooting on the stags on the football 
field and entertaining the crowd 4. 
and 5. These basketball players 
are just a couple of the great 
athletes we support 6. Some fans 
cheering on the stags at alumni 
weekend 



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/;///// to last 



OUR FIGHTING SPIRITS 

by Maegan Talt 




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^INTRODUCnON 




"Sports are positively essential. 
It is healthy to engage in sports, 
they are beautiful and liberal, 
liberal in the sense that nothing serves 
quite as well to integrate social classes, 
etc., than street or public games. " 

-Anton Pavlovich Chekhov 



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At Fairfield University, many different 
sports exist; many students compete in these 
teams, while some come to cheer on their fellow 
Stags. Throughout these past four years, these 
teams have experienced both ups and downs, 
with surprise triumphs or sometimes 
disappointing losses. Yet these phenomenal 
athletes keep their heads held high and don't 
give up. 

For the whole Fairfield community, these 
athletics offer a break from homework, lectures, 
and other stresses. Being part of team gives 
anyone the opportunity to meet new people; 
many build strong friendships that will last a 
lifetime. 

These teams represent Fairfield in 
positive ways. We all should be proud of their 
accomplishments, both on the field and in the 
classroom. The athletes work very hard, and they 
deserve everyone else's support. Our fighting 
spirits are what keep these athletics alive now 
and also in the future. 



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1 . The field hockey girls smile for a 
photo at their tournament 2. Kyle 
McClintock is about to send the ball 
across the field 3. Kiki Bruggink 
rushes to beat out her opponent 4. 
A powerhouse of a spike 



INSTANT, 
replay 



The football 

team in action, 

fighting for the 

ball. 



A stags 

basketball player 

moves to dodge 

an opponent. 



Our Stag 

mascot shows 

his support from 

the sidelines. 






11 

bitilt to last 



"I said I love you and that's forever 
And this I promise from the heart 
I could not love you any better 
I love you just the \va\' \'ou are." 

-Billy Joel 



CAPTURING 
time 



John Donovan 
and some 

friends enjoy a 
formal dinner 
and night out. 



Andrea Bialaski 

and Izabella 

Kotowski pose 

for a picture at 

one of their 

tournaments. 



Dana 

Comuniella and 

her friend hang 

out at the 

townhouses. 






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BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS 

by Laura Phiefer 



^ INTRODUCTION 






1 . The Fairfield University improv groups 
entertains a crowd outside the Barone 
Campus center 2. Students and parents 
receiving communion during a service in 
Alumni Hall on Parent's Weekend 3. The 
group of students who participated in the 
Lector Retreat in 2000 4. Members of the 
women's field hockey team enjoy some 
refreshments 




The friendships made and relationships 
formed during four years are indestructible. 
Through living, eating, studying, and partying for 
four years, memories were made and bands 
solidified. Insane times with friends, Keg Races, 
beach parties, and the irreplaceable friendships 
made during the four short years at Fairfield will 
never be forgotten. Instead, these experiences 
are imprinted in the minds and hearts as an 
amazing experience to be cherished always. 

Fairfield University is a catalyst in our 
lives that provides a dynamic environment, which 
combines all aspects of life in one community of 
five thousand. These four years at Fairfield were 
ones of hard work and play, of memories made, 
of lessons in academics and life understood, and 
of the unforgettable experience of living 
independently for the first time in your life with 
people who were once strangers but quickly 
became your chosen family. 



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1 . A scene from the April production of Henry IV 
part 1 at the Wien Expehmental Theatre, 
otherwise known as the "Black Box" 2. Reglna 
A. Quick Center for the Arts continuously has 
events for the Fairfield University community and 
residents in the area 3. The lower level of the 
Barone Campus center provides an area to study 
or catch up with friends and is home to most of 
the student organizations 4. The Glee Club 
performs several times throughout the school 
year 




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"... to a poet, the human 
community is like the 
community of birds to a bird, 
singing to each other. Love is 
one of the reasons we are 
singing to one another, love 
of language itself, love of 
sound, love of singing itself, 
and love of the other birds." 
-Sharon Olds 



commmzN 

INTRODUCTION 

BUILDING LASTING MEMORIES 

by Laura Phiefer 

As graduation quickly have made your experience at 

approaches, remember those who Fairfield University the most 

affected your life, cherish the lessons unforgettable four years of your life, 

that you have learned, look back at and think that to the world you are 

the first pictures taken during now entering you are just one 

Freshman year and compare those person, but to that one person that 

pictures to the last one taken during you have met and affected at 

your Senior year. Remember the Fairfield University, you may be the 

Z\ football games, the parties, the world. All the lessons learned, 

laughs, the tears, the turbos, the academic, about life, about 

finals, the concerts, May Days, whatever that you hold dear in your 

laying out in the Quad, Mock who heart are the nuances that the 

Weddings, and Clam Jams. Look Fairfield University experience 

back on these memories and created and these are the true 

rememberthe good times and those invaluable experiences in your life 

thus far that are built to last. 




15 

built to hist 








On Sunday, October 28, an 
Alumni Memorial Mass was held for the 
14 alumni killed in the September 11 
terrorist attacks in New York City. 

"We gather here this morning as 
the extended Fairfield University family 
- alumni, faculty, administrators, staff, 
current students and friends. We come 
together precisely because we do know 
that we are not alone. We come 

together, confident that our common prayer may celebrate the lives of those in our 
community who lost their lives on September 11th. We come together, because 
we want and hope that our presence here today can somehow comfort and console 
those among us for whom the loss of a loved one seems all so unbelievable and all 
so unbearable." 




FAIRFIELD'S SERVICE 

with speech by Father Thomas Regan, SJ 



16 

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"We celebrate not only the 
constancy of Christ in our 
journey of faith but also 
what the lives of those 
who were lost meant to us. 
We rejoice in that we have 
been so fortunate to have 
our lives touched in so 
many beautiful ways by 
the people whom God 
has sent as gifts to us. 
The reason that all of us 
experience such a great 
sense of loss is precisely 
because our love for 
those who died was so 
great. We are blessed to 
have known these men 
and women, to have 
shared so many 
wonderful moments with 
them, to have been loved 
so dearly by them." This 
is only a portion of the 
speech Father Regan 
delivered for comfort that 
day." 



DEDICATION - 2002 



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The devastating events of September IT'' have 
touched every individual in a different way. Nationally 
and locally, individually and collectively we have had to 
deal with and internalize these events to the best of out 
ability and understand that better days are ahead. As a 
community and family here at Fairfield University we 
were greatly saddened to have lost 14 of our alumni 
and one parent. We dedicate the 2002 Manor to all of 
those alumni that we lost and to every life that was 
tragically taken September 1 1 , 200 1 . They will be forever 
missed and remembered. 





Fairfield University alumni and parent who died: 
Michael Andrews, Belle Harbor, NY, Class of 1989 
Jonathan Cappello, Garden City, NY, Class of 2000 
Christopher Dunne, Garden City, NY, Class of 1995 
Steven Hagis, Staten Island, NY, Class of 1991 
H. Joseph Heller, Ridgefield, CT, Class of 1986 
Michael Jacobs, Danbury, CT, Class of 1969 
Michael Lunden, New York, NY, Class of 1986 
Frank McGuinn, Rye, NY, Class of 1974 
Patrick McGuire, Madison, NJ, Class of 1982 
William Micciulli, Mattawan, NJ, Class of 1993 
Marc Murolo, Maybood, NJ, Class of 1995 
Christopher Orgielewicz, Larchmont, NY, Class of 1987 
Johanna Sigmund, New York, NY, Class of 1998 
Christopher Slattery, New York, NY, Class of 1992 
Patrick Hoey, Parent ^y 

/;///// to List 




ufokl events 



constant change 

WORLD EVENTS 



The 2001-2002 school year will be unforgettable 
in terms of news stories. Just a few weeks Into the 
academic year the United States was faced with one 
of the worst tragedies in its history. It was a tragedy 
that touched and affected everyone and every aspect 
of American life, especially the economy and the travel 
industry. 

Americans from coast to coast united as never 
before helping along the clean-up efforts in New York 
City and Washington, D.C. In addition, the country came 
together to celebrate emergency workers, the true 
heroes of September I I, with benefit concerts. An 
abundance of money was donated to victims and their 
families. By October, our country was involved in a full- 



BY ALISHA HOLLAND 

fledged war against terrorism, while at home we battled 
the threat of anthrax. In the New Year, as the fighting 
continued in Afghanistan, the Middle East erupted in 
violence once again. One of the country's brightest 
journalists, Daniel Pearl, was kidnapped and later killed. 
Fairfield University also made news in February on 
account of the hostage situation. 

However, the year has not been all bad news. In 
the midst of the war against terror, the United States 
welcomed the 2002 Winter Olympics to Salt Lake City 
under extremely tight security. The Arizona 



The 2001-2002 school year has been filled with 
unforgettable events in world news. 



Diamondbacks won the World Series, while the New 
England Patriots took the Superbowl title. 

The entertainment world saw two blockbuster hits 
based on well-known book series: Harry Potter and Lord 
of the Rings. Throughout the year's ups and downs, the 
United States has remained strong. If this school year 
has taught us anything, it is that our country and our 
people were truly built to last. 



19 



world events 



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1 . Fire and smoke billows from the 

north tower of New York's World 

Trade Center. 2. People run from 

the collapse of the World Trade 

Center. 3. An American flag is 

posted in the rubble of the World 

Trade Center. 4. Thick smoke in 

the sky from the area behind the 

Statue of Liberty. 5. A fireman 

carries an American flag to the 

highest point he could find as Mayor 

Rudolph Giuliani and other officials 

watched. 



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President George W. Bush addresses the nation 



"Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our 
biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation 
of America. These acts shatter steel, but they cannot 
dent the steel of American resolve." 



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The United States: BUILT TO LAST 

by Alisha Holland 



September 2001 will 
certainly go down in history as a 
tragic month. Americans turned on 
their televisions on the morning of 
Tuesday, September 11, 2001 to 
seethe images ofthe famous World 
Trade Center twin towers in New 
York City collapsing in flames after 
being hit by two commercial 
airliners, American Airlines Flight 11 
and United Airlines Flight 175. Just 
half an hour later, American Airlines 
Flight 77 slammed into the 
Pentagon, headquarters to high- 




ranking military officials. An hour 
after that. United Airlines Flight 93 
crashed in a remote area of 
Pennsylvania. It was later learned 
that a group of heroic passengers 
had prevented this flight from 
destroying one of three possible 
targets: the White House, the U.S. 
Capitol building, or Camp David. 

The effects of these terrorist 
attacks were felt immediately. For 
the first time in commercial aviation 
history, all flights in the United States, 
and later Canada, were grounded, 
and most airports were evacuated. 
Federal buildings and large tourist 
attractions nationwide were shut 
down for fear of more attacks. 
President Bush was whisked away 
to a secure location, and only 
returned to the White House later that 
night to address a devastated 
nation-one that has been forever 
changed. 





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WORLD SERIES 

DIAMONDBACKS WIN THE 
WORLD SERIES, 4-3 




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AMERICA(30ES TO WAR 



As the United States began 
the long clean up and recovery 
process in the aftermath of the 
September 11 attacks, it also 
prepared to go to war. On Sunday, 
October 7, 2001 , the United States 
launched its attacks on the Taliban 
forces in Afghanistan after the al 
Qaeda network refused to hand over 
Osama bin Laden, who had claimed 
responsibility for the September 1 1 
attacks. In a televised address that 
day, President Bush announced, 
"On my orders, the United States 
military has begun strikes against al- 
Qaeda terrorist training camps and 
military installations of the Taliban 



regime in Afghanistan." 

Meanwhile, on the 
homefront, Americans faced a new 
threat: anthrax. The potentially 
deadly form of bacteria arrived in 
mail to Senator Tom Daschle, 
prompting the closing of the Capital 
building. Similar letters containing 
anthrax arrived at various media 
outlets, causing a nationwide panic 
and many false alarms. All together, 
anthrax was responsible for five 
deaths in the United States in 
October and November. 

In sports news, the Arizona 
Diamondbacks defeated the New 
York Yankees, 4-3, in the World 
Series. 



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Navy Secretary Gordon England addressed somber 
sailors: "We're learning once again that freedom and 
liberty and the American way of life are not a 
birthright," he said. "It is time for us to pick up the 
mantle to destroy terrorism and remove this cancer." 



The War Against Terror Beg'ms 





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1 . Arizona Diamondbacks celebrate 
defeating the New York Yankees 3-2 
in Game 7 of the World Series 
Sunday Nov. 4, 2001 , at Bank One 
Ballpark in Phoenix. At center 
foreground is Diamondbacks' Steve 
Finley. 2. U.S. Marines of the 15th 
Marine Expeditionary Unit, in full 
battle gear and carrying weapons 
that include small rockets, leave the 
Marine fonA/ard base in southern 
Afghanistan late Tuesday, Nov. 27, 
2001 , to take up positions in the 
desert. The base is within striking 
distance of the Taliban stronghold of 
Kandahar. 3. The aircraft carrier 
USS Theodore Roosevelt prepares to 
leave its home port at Norfolk, 
Virginia. 4. A Des Plaines, III., 
fireman bring out clothing in yellow 
plastic bags of Postal employees 
that had come in contact with a 
unknown white powder on some 
mail found at the Des Plaines Post 
Office in Des Plaines, Monday, Oct. 
15,2001. 



23 



iror/d e rents 



In an effort to control swelling crowds at the site 
of the devastated World Trade Center, the city on 
Wednesday began giving out free tickets to a viewing 
platform overlooking the attack site. 




1 .Destiny's Child, from left, Kelly 

Rowland, Beyonce Knowles and 

Michelle Williams, hold up the two 

American Music Awards they won 

for favorite soul/R&B band and 

favorite pop/rock album at the 29th 

American Music Awards in Los 

Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2002. 

2. A single engine airplane crashed 

into the Bank of America building 

Saturday afternoon, Jan. 5, 2002, in 

Tampa, Fla. According to Tampa Fire 

Department spokesman Captain Bill 

Wade the Cessna 2000 was 

registered to a St. Petersburg flight 

school. 3. A man holds five tickets 

as others wait in line for their free 

tickets to a ground zero viewing 

platform. Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2002, 

at South Street Seaport in New York 

4. Smoke pours from the Cathedral 

of St John the Divine after fire broke 

in the rear of the cathedral in New 

York, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2001. 



24 



events 





A CENTURY OLD 

The Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine, damaged by a fire, is the 
largest cathedral in the world. It 
recently celebrated its 100"" 
anniversary. 



2002 

NEW BEGINNINGS 




^ 



Topping the headlines in 
December was the attempt of a 
man, Richard Reid, to blow up an 
American Airlines flight en route 
from France to Miami with a shoe 
bomb. Following this unsuccessful 
attempt, security measures in 
airports were tightened even further, 
and shoes of random passengers 
were put through X-ray machines. 
Also in December, the famous 
Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 
New York City caught on fire. In 
science news, inventor Dean 
Kamen finally unveiled his Segway 
Human Transporter, a one-person, 
battery-powered scooter, which he 
claimed will change the way humans 
travel forever. 

Shortly into the New Year, yet 
another suicide plane crash was in 
the news. This time, it was a fifteen- 
year-old boy who flew his single 



engine airplane into the Bank of 
America building in Tampa. Later 
in the month, American Taliban 
fighterJohn Walker Lindh had his first 
court appearance. Lindh was being 
charged with conspiring to kill 
Americans in the war against 
terrorism. 

January was also an 
important month in the entertainment 
world, with broadcasts of the 
People's Choice Awards, the 
American Music Awards, and the 
Golden Globes. Big winners 
included "Shrek" for favorite motion 
picture at the People's Choice 
Awards, and Russell Crowe for best 
actor in "A Beautiful Mind" at the 
Golden Globes. 



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u^or/d events 




SUPERBOWL 

The New England Patriots 
dominated the St. Louis Rams 
on Superbowl Sunday. 




february 



GOING FOR THE GOLD 



The Winter Olympics Come To America 

by Alisha Holland 



February was a monumental 
month in the sports world. Under 
unprecented security measures, the 
Superbowl and the 2002 Winter 
Olympics took place. Superbowl 
XXXVI was hallmarked by the New 
England Patriots' victory, and also 
by a special half-time performance 
featuring U2 and a tribute to victims 
of the September 1 1 th attacks. 

The Winter Olympics were 
equally special, as the games 
returned to the United States. The 
opening ceromony was held on 
February 8, 2002, in Salt Lake City, 



Utah. Thegames were not without 
controversy, as the Canadian figure 
skating pair, Jamie Sale and David 
Pelletier, complained that they were 
cheated out of the gold medal, which 
was awarded to Russian skaters 
Yelena Berezhnaya and Anton 
Sikharulidze. An investigation into 
the judging system found that a 
French judge had taken a bribe to 
vote for the Russian team. As a 
result, both pairs were awarded a 
gold medal (photo:left middle). 
Overall, Germany lead the medal 
standings with 35, the United States 
came in a close second with 34, and 
Norway rounded out the top three 
with 24. 




|26 

II arid I rents 




1 . New England Patriots' coach Bill 
Belichick holds the Super Bowl 
trophy after the Patriots beat the St. 
Louis Rams 20-1 7 in Super Bowl 
XXXVI at the Louisiana Superdome, 
Sunday, Feb. 3, 2002, in New 
Orleans. 2. USA's Casey 
FitzRandolph carries an American 
flag during his victory lap following 
the men's 500m speedskating 
competition in Salt Lake City, 
Tuesday, Feb. 12,2002. 
FitzRandolph won the gold. 3. Sarah 
Hughes of the United States waves 
to the crowd with her gold medal, 
after women's skating competition at 
the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake 
City, Thursday, Feb. 21 , 2002. 
4. Members ofthe 1980 U.S. Gold 
Medal Olympic hockey team light 
the Olympic flame at Rice-Eccles 
Olympic Stadium during the opening 
ceremonies ofthe 2002 Winter 
Olympics in Salt Lake City Friday, 
Feb. 8, 2002. 



27 

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recovering 



THE WAR CONTINUES 



As the school year came to 
a close, the United States continued 
the clean-up process and its war on 
terrorism. Fighting in Afghanistan 
carried on as American forces 
scoured the scores of caves in that 
country, looking for any sign of bin 
Laden or other Taliban members. 

On March 11, 2002, a 
temporary memorial was set up in 
New York to remember the six month 
anniversary of the September 11 
attacks. The memorial consisted of 
two beams of light that shone into 
the sky, near the site of the World 



Trade Centers. 

In addition, Homeland 
Security Director Tom Ridge 
unveiled a new color-coded security 
warning system for the United States 
in response to complaints from the 
public that the numerous security 
warnings were vague. 

President Bush campaigned 
for peace in the Middle East, as 
fighting erupted once more between 
Israel and Palestine. 

In entertainment news, the 
Screen Actors Guild Awards took 
place on March 10, with Halle Berry 
grabbing the award for outstanding 
performance by a female actor in a 
leading role for her work in 
"Monster's Ball." 







2lf 

II nrUl eve tits 





Navy Secretary Gordon England addressed somber 
sailors: "We're learning once again that freedom and 
liberty and the American way of life are not a 
birthright," he said. "It is time for us to pick up the 
mantle to destroy terrorism and remove this cancer." 



The War Against Terror Begins 





I. Members of the U.S. Army 
1 01 St Division return from Bagram, 
Afghanistan where they were part of 
the recent fight in the Paktia 
province to the military airbase in 
Kandahar, Afghanistan, Tuesday, 
March 12. 2. Two beams light up 
the sky above Manhattan on March 

II. They are a temporary memorial 
that will light up every evening till 
April 13. 3. Actress Halle Berry 
reacts as she holds the award she 
won for outstanding performance by 
a female actor in a leading role for 
her work in the film, "Monster's 
Ball," at the 8th annual Screen 
Actors Guild Awards Sunday, March 
10, 2002, in Los Angeles. 4. First 
Sgt. Johnathan Blossom, of the 2nd 
Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 
101st Airborne Division, runs for 
cover during a fire fight Sunday, 
March 3, near Sirkankel, 
Afghanistan. Although U.S. forces 
have used high tech weaponry in the 
conflict the latest battles in 
Operation Anaconda have often 
come down to mortar vs. mortar. 



29 

u-'or/d events 




,30 

cdpip/is events 



whats going on 



PUS EVENTS 



Concerts, exhibits, dances, festivals, 
dedications, and other special events occur almost 
every day at Fairfield. Because we are a small school, 
it can be difficult to draw big crowds to these things. 
However, almost the whole school participated in some 
of these events. Whether you attend a concert at the 
Quick Center or a barbeque out in the quad, it is evident 
that lots of hard work got put into making these things 
possible. 

This school year, many new changes were 
evident on campus. The Barone Campus Center and 
the DiMenna-Nyselius Library were finally finished, and 
new projects such as the field construction began. With 
this new and improved campus center, students finally 



BY MAEGAN TALT 

had nice areas to sit and relax while not in class, and a 
place to play pool after eating a meal. The library is 
now much more organized, and it is easier to find the 
things one is looking for. Our campus is looking better 
almost every day. 

Campus events provide inexpensive and diverse 
ways to have fun, and there is almost always something 
to do. These things give us something to look forward 
to during the week. Not all schools have as much 
opportunity to fund these types of things, so we should 
realize how lucky we are to be a Stag. 



THESE DISTINCT INDIVIDUALS REPRESENT 

THE DIVERSITY OF STUDENT INTERESTS 

THAT COMBINE TO MAKE A COMPLETE 

PACKAGE OF STUDENT LIFE. 



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campus events 




Remembrance 

The University hopes to keep 
alive the memories of these 
irreplaceable individuals, and 
looks tow/ard a future where 
terrorist actions no longer 
threaten our country or any 
country of the world. 





Strikes 

AMPUS EVENTS 



REACTIONS AT FAIRFIELD TO SEPTEMBER I ITH 

by Maegan Talt 



This school year seemed as 
though it would begin as normal; 
however, less than a week after 
classes began, tragedy struck our 
nation. Nobody can forget the 
horrible events that occurred on 
September II. 2001. Many 
students at Fairfield University 
suffered losses from the terrorist 
attacks, and everyone was affected 
in some way. 

In response to this 
unfortunate event, the Fairfield 
community came together to 
remember the victims and provide 
support. Several services, blood 
drives, and information sessions 



were held on campus over the next 
few days, and even months. Many 
faculty and staff made themselves 
available to help out in whatever 
ways they could, such as talking to 
students who needed much support. 
An event such as this could 
not have been predicted. This 
experience changed many people's 
thoughts. We were all away from our 
families, but realized that we had our 
own kind of "family" here at our 
Fairfield campus. We all reached 
out to each other this day, and hope 
to never experience great losses 
like this again. 



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camt>iis events 



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'We come together, confident that our common prayer 
may celebrate the lives of those in our community who 
lost their lives on September 11... We come together 
because we want and hope that our presence here 
today can somehow comfort and console those among 
us for whom the loss of a loved one seems all so 
unbelievable and all so unbearable. " 
-Rev. Thomas J. Regan, S.J. 



Fairfield University is united in spirit 




1 . These are the people who 
organized and held the mass on 
September 11th 2. InsideAlumni 
Hall, people pray and hope for some 
lucky survivors 3. Dr. Kevin 
Cassidy, a politics professor, spoke 
at the candlelight vigil on September 
20th 4. Many members of Fairfield 
community gather on the lawn in 
front of the chapel on September 
11th 5. On September 20, a 
student-sponsored candlelight vigil 
was held at the Regina A. Quick 
Center for the Arts. Huy Huynh was 
among those who lit a candle in 
honor of the September 1 1 th victims 
6. Fairfield University students 
watch the news coverage on the 
WTC terrorist attacks in the 
cafeteria 7. Duhng oneof the 
September 11th masses, students 
hug and console each other 



33 

campus evsjits 



"The World is not dangerous because of 

those who do harm but because of those who 

look at it without doing anything. " 

- Albert Einstein 




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,34 




campus events 



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Coming back to school can be a 
mixture of dread (because of the 
school work) and excitement 
(friends, friends, friends!). With 
an exciting beginning such as 
this StagStock, the year ahead 
seemed like it would be the best 
ever 



we're back! 

CAMPUS EVENTS 



Despite the tragic events that 
occurred around this time, many 
blissful things improved the sad 
situation. This relatively new event 
was extremely successful at the 
beginning of this year, providing a 
warm and happy welcome back to 
school. Luckily, the sun shone 
brightly as more than two thousand 
people gathered in the quad to listen 
to music, enjoy a barbeque, and 
catch up with friends. This year's 
events attracted many more people 
than last year, possibly because of 
great planning. After all, everyone 
could attend this celebration for free! 



Much of the credit can go to 
the fantastic performances of two 
bands. To open the night, 
sophomore Tim Warren's band 
Karmageddon played exceptionally 
well. Then came the newly recording 
artists O.A.R (Of A Revolution), who 
displayed a mixture of reggae and 
rock. Everyone was having a great 
time singing, dancing, crowd surfing, 
and anything else; this band really 
knew how to work up their lively 
crowd. 

It was obvious that the school 
year 2001-02 was going to be a 
great one, as the seniors cherished 
their last year of college life. 




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35 

campus events 



This year's Parents' Weekend 

proved very successful, improving 

every year. It was exceptionally a 

touching experience because most 

families could not be completely 

together to comfort each other after 

the September 11'" events. 




welcome parents 

CAMPUS EVENTS 



For many students, it was the 
first time they saw their parents since 
leaving for school in early 
September. It can be safe to guess 
that almost everyone felt great 
comfort when mom, dad, grandma, 
grandpa, and anyone else arrived to 
campus. On October 20th, 2001, 
the annual Parents' Weekend was 
held here at Fairfield University. 

Many families arrived bright 
and early on Saturday morning, with 
an exciting day ahead of them. They 
were welcomed with a speech from 



PARENTS' WEEKEND 

by Maegan Talt 

Father Kelly, and then moved on to 
several kinds of information 
sessions to learn about what 
happens at Fairfield. For a great 
opportunity to relax and have fun. 
Theatre Fairfield gave an 
entertaining performance about 
what life is like at our university. 

After a nice mass in Alumni 
Hall, the night entertainment began 
with Taylor Mason, a comedian and 
ventriloquist. If they felt like an even 
more laid-back scene, a coffee shop 
was open on campus, with music 
playing. 




I?6 



aimpiis events 



Before having to say sad goodbyes again, families 
could attend a brunch on campus, the Glee Club 
concert, and the National Jesuit Honor Society 
induction ceremony 





Whether families participated in all the events the school provided or just 
took their children out to do things their own way, this weekend proved a very 
positive experience. 

7 




, ^ >,•-.■ .Ill it .•^•.'i&»ai 




1 . A dad tries on a Fairfield Stags 
hat at the bookstore 2. Parents 
and faculty nneet and chat a bit 3. 
Students and parents gather in 
alumni hall for entertainment 4. 
Food at Fairfield never looked so 
good! 5. Everyone helps 
themselves to a delicious breakfast 
6.A meal is served at Barone 
Campus Center and I bet you 
wonder why the food isn't like this 
everyday 7. FUSA President Joseph 
Piagentini sits with his parents, 
enjoying a nice meal together 8. 
The glee club performs for people at 
Alumni Hall 9. A grandmother 
participates in a skit with the improv 
group 



37 

campus events 




Luckily, nobody got hurt in the process, and the 

bomb was just a threat. Many also said that 

Arbelo often seemed frightened himself and tried 

to play games with the students. To make this 

story even more unusual, this man was legally 

blind, and often seen with his guide dog. He still 

managed to hold 23 hostages, for a reason only 

he may really know. These people were very 

brave and we should also acknowledge the 

various help we received from the State Police. 

the FBI, the Secret Service, and others. 




an unexpected event 



CAMPUS EVENTS 



Nothing could prepare us for 
something like what happened this 
day. On February 12, 2002, a class 
of students and their professor were 
taken hostage in Canisius Hall. 
First, the students had to throw all 
their bags out of the second-story 
window, which obviously looked 
suspicious. Next, Father Regan 
engaged in a brief conversation with 
the suspect. However, this man next 
claimed to have a bomb and 
declared that he was keeping 
everyone in the room, including 



CANISIUS HELD HOSTAGE 

by Maegan Talt 

Professor Elizabeth Dreyer. 
Everyone was evacuated out of the 
classroom building and dismissed 
from their classes. In the 
neighboring buildings Donnarumma 
and Gonzaga, people were also 
evacuated and all evening classes 
were cancelled. Negotiations 
began, yet this process took a very 
long time. 



38 

campus even 1.1 



l/l/e should also listen to 

Father Kelley's words, and 

not "forget to pray for Patrick 

Arbelo, whose troubled 

actions yesterday reveal a 

need for prayer." 




Because of the evacuations, many 
were left without somewhere to go for the 
rest of the day. Students stood outside in 
the cold, sat in the campus center, or visited 
with friends in other buildings. All were 
wondering what exactly was going on in 
Canisius. Surprisingly, this man was a 
recent graduate of Fairfield from the class 
of 2001, named Patrick Arbelo. One by 
one, the hostages were released over the 
next few hours. At 8 pm, a candlelight 
prayer service was held near the softball 
field. The last hostage was finally released 
around 10 pm, and Patrick Arbelo was 
taken into custody soon after. 



39 

campus events 





On Saturday in the quad, there 
were carnival rides that many 
enjoyed. In addition, there was a 
barbeque with lots of food, a 
cotton candy stand, and candy 
apples. Our campus bands 
Crosseyed Charlie and Awkward 
Silence provided entertaining 
music, and then a dj took over. 



it's that time again 



CAMPUS EVENTS 



This year's May Day was 
very successful and enjoyed by all. 
The Saturday events at the 
townhouses and the quad were very 
organized and successful. All over 
campus everyone gathered outside 
to socialize and relax. Carnival rides 
were setup in the quad for the 
underclassmen along with a BBQ 
and some volleyball. 

Up at the townhouses, 
Spam Jam was getting underway for 
the upperclassmen. This was 
sponsored by UNITE, University 
Townhouse Experience and 
RASOR, Residential Apartment 



^40 

camp Hi even Is 



MAY DAY CELEBRATIONS 

by Maegan Talt 

Student Organization. Seniors and 
Juniors were able to kick back and 
savor some of the last party 
moments with their friends. 

The greatness of the annual 
Clam Jam that was supposed to 
happen on Sunday was the missing 
link to the festivities this year. 
Although some were able to find a 
party or two at the beach many were 
left with only reminders from past 
years. 

This weekend still did prove 
to be a great end of the year event. 
May day is a great way for students 
to forget about classes and overdue 
work and enjoy themselves as the 
end of the school year is fast 
approaching. 




1 . students enjoying a ride in the Scrannbler 
outside of Jogues 2. Many wait their turn to go 
down the Fun Slide 3. The Scrambler spun 
around and around 4. The swings can remind 
everyone oftheirfavorite carnival 5. A volleyball 
net was set up all day for anyone to use 
6. Mmm mmm good barbeque . . . instead of 
the usual Barone food 




fe#'v:vii 



41 

campus events 




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ccinipiis events 



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honoring the best E 




CAMPUS EVENTS 



On April 29, the annual 
athletics award banquet was held. 
The Fairfield University Department 
of Athletics honored all varsity 
student-athletes, as well as giving 
out varsity letters and major awards. 

The Female Athlete of the 
Year award was given to senior Iza 
Kotowski (above, left) of 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey. She 
became the first Stag field hockey 
player to score more than 100 
points in her career. She also led 
her team to its first Patriot League 
championship. Senior Ajou Deng 
(above, right-top) from London was 
awarded the Male Athlete of the 



ATHLETIC AWARDS BANQUET 

by Maegan Talt 

Year, for his performance as a 
forward on the basketball team. He 
led the team in rebounding and 
scoring, shooting 34 three-point 
baskets. 

William Wallin is an example 
of sportsmanship, character, and 
leadership, and his award is given 
to a student-athlete who displays 
these characteristics. This year, 
women's crew team coxswain 
Jessica DeMarco (above, right- 
bottom) of Hillsdale, New Jersey 
received the award. Another 
important honor is the Arthur Ashe 
tennis awards, which were given to 
Joseph Fennel and Kelly DiMario. 



J 




Fairfield also honors the top 
freshmen athletes, and this year the 
Female Freshman of the Year was 
Meghan King (left) from Charleston, 
Massachusetts, who played 
exceptionally well for the soccer team. 
She earned the MA AC Rookie of the 
Year honor The Male Freshman of 
the Year award was given to Deng Gai 
(right) of the basketball team, coming 
all the way from Sudan. He received 
the MAAC Player of the Year award 
after appearing in all 23 starts. 






The collector of the men's 
award was a soccer player Rob 
DeFaverifrom Ontario. During his 
career, he obtained three MAAC All- 
Academic honors and All-New 
England honors. He was very 
successful and was drafted by the 
Montreal Impact in the second round 
of the A-League professional draft. 
DeFaveri is the all-time score leader 



The recipient of the 2002 Alumni Association 
Female Student-Athlete of the Year was Amy Hurford of 
South Canterbury New Zealand for her success on the 
basketball team. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, 
received a Student Achievement Award for 2001 -02, and is 
a finalist for the NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship. She 
was a co-captain of the team and started every game this 
season, leading the team in field goal percentage. 



- 43 

campus events 




Barone Campus Center Reopening 

The Barone Campus Center was 
finally completed this school year, open for 
everyone to enjoy. Many took part in the 
remodeling and planning process, and now 
there is a wonderful central place for 
students to meet with each other. 



DiMenna-Nyselius Library Dedication 

The library name was finally made 
official, when it was formally dedicated on 
October 4th. Joseph A. DiMenna, Jr. and 
his wife Maureen were both thanked for their 
large contributions. Mr. DiMenna noted 
that, "In the physical sense, we have built 
a beautiful building. However the completed 
project is more than that; it is a place of 
knowledge and culture." 



,44 

canrpiis CI Tilts 






CAMPUS EVENTS 



New traditions were started 
during this year's homecoming, with 
a variety of events added to the 
normal football game. A 

masquerade ball, scavenger hunt, 
haunted house, and Oktoberfest are 
a few things that were included in 
Homecoming week. 

The idea is to bring more 
students into participating in the 
activities, while still including the 
large number of alumni that return 
during this time to show their support 
and spirit. 

A two-hour concert by the Pat 
McGee Band was held in the Barone 
Campus Center's lower level (photo, 
left), attracting many. 



HOMECOMING WEEKEND 

by Maegan Talt 

Students filled the floor, with 
many others lining up the stairs or 
peering from the above balcony. 
The Pat McGee Band played a 
mixture of favorites, both new and 
old. The atmosphere and music 
filled Barone with an upbeat feeling. 

Homecoming really came 
alive this year, and it will continue to 
become better every year. With 
great participation and spirit from 
the Fairfield University community, 
exciting events like this make the 
atmosphere here seem all the more 
welcoming. 




45 

campus events 



HUNGER and HOMELESSNESS WEEK 

The week of November I 1-16 was This event is national, and many other 

very important this year, as people raised colleges also participated. The money we 

money for the hungry and homeless. Many raised here went to local Bridgeport shelters 

different opportunities existed for people to and halfway houses, as well as an 

participate in. Students could donate a organization called OXFAM. 
meal from their meal plan or any canned 
foods they had, sleep outside in the quad 
on the 14*, or fast as a group on the I5'\ 





In October, the lower floors of the 

Barone Campus Center were shut down. 

This was because of the possibility of an 

anthrax outbreak. It all started when a 

female student opened a letter and saw a 

white powdery substance, but this was 

later proven to be nothing harmful. 



«r 



campus events 




ALUMNI MEMORIAL MASS 

Over a thousand people attended the Alumni Memorial Mass held on Sunday, 
October 28th in Alumni Hall. This was an incredible gathering of people, and we 
remembered those lost on September 11 th. 



a new look at life 

CAMPUS EVENfTS 




Events are always taking 
place around campus during the 
year. Some for fun and some to help 
students become more aware of the 
world around us. Events like these 
tend to bring people together and 
allow us to see just how lucky we all 
are. 

At the beginning of the year, 
there were a lot of things going on. 
For example, we had our own 
anthrax scare here at Fairfield. Yet 
we took precautions and organized 
the course of action to take. Luckily, 
there was no anthrax and everybody 
was safe. 

In another area. National 
Hunger and Homelessness Week 



WE COME TOGETHER 

by Maegan Talt 

helped students to gain an 
awareness about kinds of life that 
mostof us know nothing about. Most 
people here have not come close to 
this sort of poverty. We have 
opportunities that many take for 
granted. As a result of this week, 
some realized what kind of 
difference they can make in the 
world or in someone's life and how 
fortunate we are. 

Also, we took time to 
remember those lost in the 
September Nth tragedies. The 
significance of these events is 
massive and will never be forgotten. 



47 

campus events 




This amazing R & B quartet 
really knew how to perform. They 
incorporated high-energy acts, 
occasional calming moments, and 
interactions with the audience; this 
made the students very pleased with 
the show. Any show like this should 
not be missed. 




48 

t(inipii.<i cvoits 




One lucky female member of the 
audience even got to go on stage 
to oil one of the members down. 



rockin alumni hall 

CAMPUS EVENTS 




Here at Fairfield University, 
people listen to a wide variety of 
music making it very difficult to pick 
one particular artist or group to 
perform on campus. In the past, LL 
Cool J, Ben Harper, Rusted Root, 
and Wyclef Jean all held concerts 
here. This year, it was decided that 
the R & B group I 12 would come 
sing to us at Alumni Hall. The 
promotion for this concert expanded 
outside of campus for the first year, 
giving Sacred Heart University 
students a chance to buy tickets at 



I 12 CONCERT 

by Maegan Talt 

the same discounted price as 
Fairfield tudents. 

I 1 2 took the stage on Friday, 
November 30, 2001. They definitely 
proved they could entertain and 
move the audience. This sold-out 
crowd screamed happily, danced, 
and sang along to the music. This 
four-man group mixed together their 
old and new hits, and their talent was 
obvious. The crowd only quieted 
when I 12 held a moment of silence 
to remember those in the 
September IT'' tragedy, then 
followed up this touching time with a 
gospel song. 



49 

campus events 




50 m 
(■(impiis life 



moments and memories 

CAMPUS LIFE 



In addition to academics, student life here at 
Fairfield University has a strong influence on the people 
we become. While academics prepare us for future 
careers and expand our minds, student life is about 
becoming well-rounded individuals. As freshmen, we 
leave the comforts of home and friends, some of whom 
we have known for our whole lives, to begin a new and 
life-altering experience. Immediately, we are presented 
with the challenges of dorm life-learning to live with 
people who often have values and beliefs different from 
our own, trying to adjust to wearing shoes in the shower, 
eating dining hall food, and pulling "all-nighters." 
Suddenly, we must assume responsibility for our own 
actions- making sure we actually sleep some nights, 



BY ALISHA HOLLAND 

wake up in the morning, and make it to class. However, 
student life is much more than learning to be 
responsible. It is also about having fun, from meeting 
new people and future best friends, to late night 
conversations and 2 A.M. pizzas. Our personal growth 
continues in sophomore year, when we learn to focus 
on being at school rather than being away from home. 
Finally, as juniors and seniors, our world opens up even 
more as we graduate from the dorms to the townhouses, 
apartments, or beach houses. In just four short years, 



THINGS WILL COME AND GO IN YOUR LIFE 

BUT THAT FRIEND YOU CAN COUNT ON WILL 

ALWAYS BE THERE 



we gain an amazing amount of independence and life 
skills, all the while forging friendships that will last a 
lifetime. With an incalculable number of memories and 
priceless experiences, life at Fairfield prepares us to 
live on our own as educated adults. 



51 



campus 




campua life 




Moving into the dorms is 
quite a traumatic experience for a 
student entering college. Anxiety not 
only inflicts the nervous freshman, it 
extends to the kid's poor mother and 
father, as well. In an attempt to calm 
their own nerves, parents spout out 
general rules for living that most kids 
have considered common 
knowledge for years. "Remember to 
be courteous to your roommate". 
Yes Mother, I was going to try to make 
some friends. 

The actual act of moving into 




LIFE AT FAIRFIELD 

by Liz McCracken 



the dorms freshman year is 
complicated, nerve-wracking, and 
exciting. Driving onto campus, the 
kid glances into the other cars 
thinking, "maybe that's my 
roommate", trying to look cool, aloof, 
and unattached from Mom and Dad. 
Dad gets inspired by the welcoming 
committee holding balloons and 
waving and decides to roll down the 
window to return the sentiment, 
waving and shouting the year of the 
poor child's college graduation. 
Meanwhile, Mom sees an 
emergency blue box that she was 
told about on the college tour. "See 
there, you just push a button right 
there if you are being disturbed by a 
hoodlum. Campus security will get 
to you in less that three minutes." 
Mom has really been doing her 
homework. 






53 



campus life 




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((itnpK^ life 




a place to call home 

CAMPUS LIFE 






Greeted by a perky Resident 
Assistant, both child and parents 
begin the long tedious process of 
transferring the necessities for 
college living into the dorm. Mom 
takes on the role of chief overseer, 
suddenly becoming knowledgeable 
about the correct and most 
proficient system of moving large 
items. 

Inside the dorm room, the 
roommates finally get to meet and 
size each other up. The presence of 
both kid's parents hinders them from 



truly getting to know each other, but 
they do agree that their parents are 
utterly mortifying and need to leave 
the premises immediately. The dorm 
room is not exactly built to 
accommodate six nervous, jittery 
people. The Moms chatter about the 
room's ventilation and where they 
can store the ironing board. The 
Dads banter about the Fairfield 
athletic teams and try to do "manly" 
things such as moving furniture and 
lofting beds. 






55 



campus life 




(inipns lift 




livinitup 



CAMPUS LIFE 




After several hours of 
organizing, rearranging, and 
cleaning, the time finally comes for 
the parents to return home. Misty 
eyed, both Mom and Dad try to recall 
any last minute words of wisdom for 
their precious child. They bid 
farewell to the new roommate, ask 
again for the RA's name (just in case 
there is an emergency), and head 
for the door Both roommates watch 
the door as it slowly closes and begin 
to breathe a sigh of relief before 
Mom leans her head back into the 
room. "Remember that your 
refrigerator stops working when you 



use your microwaves, so be careful. 
You don't want any food to spoiT'.You 
try to save yourself and your social 
life by saying that you will cancel the 
turkey dinner that you had been 
planning to cook hoping that your 
roommate might appreciate your 
joke. You give your mom The Look 
and apologize to your roommate for 
having to hear that. The latch on the 
door clicks closed and college finally 
begins. 



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57 



campus life 



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one for all 



CAMPUS LIFE 



Freshmen year in the dorms 
is filled with trying to juggle freedom, 
get schoolwork done, and find a 
couple of friends. After some 
experimentation, most pinpoint their 
alcohol tolerance and proceed to 
talk about that for the rest of the year. 
Roaming around the townhouses 
trying find an upperclassman wasted 
enough to let you in their party is an 
acceptable way to spend a Friday 
night. Doing laundry becomes a 
memory of the past and RA's 
become the feared law enforcers 



LIFE AT FAIRFIELD 

by Liz McCracken 

with the ability to "write you up". The 
term "sex-iled" is realized and used 
in whatever context is available as 
sort of a right of passage into the 
college life. Binge drinking is finally 
fully understood. The guy on the third 
floor who manages to sneak the keg 
up to his room in Jogues becomes 
the hero for the week and the major 
complaint is "If I only had my car". 



carf^us Itje 




campus lije 




60 . 

ftimpns life 






Although most students are 
still housed in the dorms their 
sophomore year, they have the 
advantage of being able to pick their 
own rooms and roommates. The 
neurotic freshman roommate is 
replaced with the best friend who 
understands your own 

idiosyncrasies. With luck, a student 
might get a spacious room in 
Gonzaga with a nice view of the 
quad. However, those rooms are few 
and far between and most settle on 
anything varying from a dim. 




LIFE AT FAIRFIELD 

by Liz McCracken 



cramped room in Campion to a suite 
in Katska-Claver. College life 
becomes more regular. The 
freedom that was so exciting as a 
freshman becomes routine. 
Sophomores start to actually know 
the people that live in the 
townhouses and the beach and 
weekends, therefore, become a bit 
more varied. Sophomores are 
granted the privilege of having a car 
on campus, which greatly expands 
their knowledge of the surrounding 
area and what it has to offer. . The 
bathrooms that once seemed 
adequate are exposed to be filthy 
nesting ground for every kind of 
bacteria imaginable. Although dorm 
life serves the basic function of 
providing students a place to sleep, 
sophomores start to recognize the 
downfalls of communal living and 
yearn for a more private residence. 




61 



campus life 





enjoying the moment 

CAMPUS LIFE 



_i -^ 

UJ % 

u- u 

< N 



l_ >^ 



Junior and seniors have the 
luxury of having a great chance of 
getting to live in a townhouse, an 
apartment, or take a whole different 
approach and head for the beach. 
The pressure of choosing a major 
looms and schoolwork becomes 
more specialized. When students 
get nostalgic, their conversations 
sound more like "Remember when 
we were freshmen in Regis..." 
rather than "Remember at prom..." 
like they do when students enter 
college. Although drinking is still a 



favorite pastime, being legally able 
to drink wipes away some of the 
allure and mystery from the younger 
years. Hangouts move down to the 
beach and bars rather than on 
campus. College finally comes 
completely comfortable and the final 
years at Fairfield are spent having 
as much fun as possible before 
entering into the working world. 



62 



(ii, 



mpns life 



Students filled 
the bottom and 
balcony of the 
BCC to listen 
to the Pat 
Magee Band. 




63 



campus life 



always better with friends 



CAMPUS LIFE 



64*, 



"Iht only way to have a friend 
is to be one." 

-Ralph Waldo Emerson 



fti. 



mplif life 




' 







Friendship is the hardest 
thing in the world to 
explain. It's not something 
you learn in school. But if 
you haven't learned the 
meaning of friendship, you 
really haven't learned 
anything. 

-Muhammad Ali 



65 



cam. 



ipus lije 




1 . Right: Rick Briamonte and John 
Griffin entertain during Rock and Jock 

2. Right: Front Row: Erin Morrell, 
Zachary Tarry k, Tater the Gator (from 
the Norwich Navigators), Debbie 
Home (from the Make-A-Wish 
Foundation) Back Row: Nick 
Martinelli. F<ip Marin i. Rich 
Raddochia, Chris Biello 



66 . 

campia: life 





Above: The Black Team - Back Row: John Falzone, Kat O'Connell, Karen 
Seavers, Sandy Stock, Erin Curtin, Frank Ficko, Jonathan Stark, Eddie Seavers, 
Francesca Cobb, Jennifer, Cherly Covino, Patty Covino, Kelsie Dewalt Front 
Row: Caitlin Russell, Dani BrownJeanne Dimuzio, Sarah Courtney, Kelly Chappie, 
Natalie Glavan, John Crotty 




Above: The Grey Team - Front Row: Steve Dailey, Diance Dains, 
Erica Blecich, Rip Marini Back Row: Dan Stallonis, Mike Franco, 
Dave Currier, LeAnne Mistysyn, Erin Fredericks, Jeremy Nappi, Chad 
Russolillo, James Fitzpatrick, Martin Kelly, Ferdi Fabregas, Rich 
Raddochia, Steve Acevedo, Eileen Bossone Third Row: Scott 
Vetare, Nick Marinell, Mike Rupp 






67 

campus l^ 




i» mrvK.mmmrm^'*^ 



68 , 

cdmpiis life 




campus life 




clubs c~ activities 



zettim involved 



CLUBS & ACTIVITIES 



You Ve got five classes overflowing with work to catch 
up on, parties to throw or attend, and fiiends to hang out with, 
but somehow most students manage to balance the hassles and 
commitments and make time to join one of the many and diverse 
student groups. FUSA, The Mirror, WVOF, The Glee Club, 
Theatre Fairfield, plus so many more all help to define the 
Fairfield campus and its character and make it what it is. These 
student groups are active participants in the everyday happenings 
around campus, helping to get newcomers involved and make 
an enjoyable atmosphere. 

The lull "Fairfield Experience" would be seriously 



BY REBECCA YOUNG 

lacking without belonging to an organization or attending 
some of the many events that they plan and host. 
Participating in activities is a huge part of getting a taste of 
"true" college life, making new Iriends, and trying something 
new. To find a common interest with others, no matter if it's 
dancing, volunteering, debating, or acting, makes the 
connection all the more important. 

The vastness of involvement and goals of such 



AIM FOR THE MOON, FOR IF YOU FAIL, YOU 
WILL BE AMONG THE STARS. 



groups proves that Fairfield students are truly motivated, 
dedicated, and unbelievably talented individuals, who are 
capable of great success. 



^ 71 

clubs <& activities 




"What is important is to 
keep learning,, to enjoy 
challenge, and to tolerate 
ambiguity. In the end there 
are no certain answers. " 

-Martina Horner 



clubs <& activities 



Left: WVOF opened the doors to its brand-new three-studio complex in 
the John A. Barone Campus Center in March. Visitors toured the glassed- 
in studios to take a look at the station s new capabilities. 

In addition to live audio Internet broadcasts (which began in 2000), 
WVOF will also have the ability to transmit live visually, via a Web cam 
that will be posted in the main studio. Radio hosts will also be able to 
receive e-mailed music requests. The station has plans to incorporate live 
call-in talk shows into its schedule, and to feed programs and events from 
New York City clubs and theatres. 

Pictured with station manager Jeff Stone '03 at the microphone are 
(l-r) Cassey Timoney, student broadcast coordinator; Stan Hiriak '73, 
MA 75, one of the station 's founding members who currently serves on the 
advisory board; Matt Dinnan, associate dean of students and station 
general manager; Thomas Osenkowsky, engineer; and Mark Weiss, 
engineer. 








Above: Dragon Parade: The Oak Room was alive with color on February 21 
for the annual Chinese New Year celebration. The evening featured Chinese 
cuisine, a Zheng musician, classical and folk dances, traditional songs sung 
by the Chinese language class, and a dragon parade, pictured above, led by 
members of the Asian Performing Arts group. 



73 

clubs (& actimties 




O 3 

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theatre fairfteld 

PRODUCTION COMPANY 



Theatre Fairfield is a 
production company. Theatre 
Fairfield is a family. We're made up 
of all grades, all genders, all ages. 
We fight like brothers and sisters 
and work together like 
professionals. In the last four years 
and for years past and years to 
come, we have produced quality 
theatre written, directed, run, and 
acted by students and 
professionals. Now, as with all 
families, some of us are going our 
separate ways, and as always, 



others will come to replace us. We 
were a part of a wonderful program. 
Thanks for watching us. That's all 
we ever asked. 

-Theatre Fairfield 

Class of 2002 

Graduating Seniors: Amy 
Mattulina, Rehan Ansari, Lindsey 
Loderstadt, Katie Mooney, Lara 
Eckler, Kim Divencenzo, Ed 
Walsh, and Scott Ferguson 



W 



cluhs <& activities 




If we want to see where we went wrong 
We needn't look too far, 
For where we 11 be and where we've been 
Is always where we are. 
And everything that comes your way 
Is something you once gave, 
Somebody feels the water 
Every time you make a wave. 
3 - Thom Bishop 



''Live and savor every moment..Life is not a dress rehersal" 




iiibs <c^ activities 




|76 

cltda (& activities 



1 . A scene from Lend Me a Tenor. 
L to R: Megal Bell, Jessica Michael, 
Paul Robinson, Ed Walsh, and Bill 
Brea 2. L to R: Rehan Ansari, 
Lindsey Loderstadt, Katie Mooney, 
and Amy Mattulina 3. The seniros 
relaxing on the roof L to R: Ed, 
Katie, Lindsey, Rehan, Lara, Amy, 
and Scott 4. Lara Eckler and Liz 
Capinera 5. The cast of Lend Me a 
Tenor. Top L to R: Rob Williams, Ed 
Walsh, Bill Brea, Paul Robinson. 
Bottom L to R: Liz Capinera, Kristy 
Farrell, Jessica Michael, Megan Bell 
6. Scott and Ed...lookn' good! 



a 




''Acting is an ajfair of the heart'' -o sman lady 



Phillip Henslowe: Mr. Fennyman, allow me to explain about the theatre 

business. The natural condition is one of insurmountable 
obstacles on the road to imminent disaster. 

Hugh Fennyman: So what do we do? 

Phillip Henslowe: Nothing. Strangely enough, it all turns out well. 

Hugh Fennyman: How? 

Phillip Henslowe: I don't know. It's a mystery. 



-Shakespeare In Love 




73 



> 

73 



O 
O 



I 

o 
o 



77 

c/ubs CT actinties 




WVOF staff 

Station Manager: Jeff Stone 
Program Director: Dave McGovern 
Marketing Director: Steve Oliver 
Web/Operations Director: Ctiris Anders 
Sports Director: John Griffin 



88. 5 wvof 




FAIRFIELD RADIO 



WVOF began its operations 
in the fall of 1973, broadcasting at 
88.5 FM fronn the ground floor of 
Regis Hall. The station's lOO-watt 
signal allowed listeners around 
Fairfield County to hear the Voice 
of Fairfield. 

Today, WVOF broadcasts 
from 9am to 2am on weekdays and 
24 hours on the weekends. In March 
of 2002, WVOF moved to its new 
state-of-the-art studios on the main 
floor of the Barone Campus Center. 
WVOF has seen a 500% increase 



THE VOICE OF FAIRFIELD 

by Jeff Stone 

in student involvement over the past 
year, going from less than 10 
students last year to over 60 this year. 
WVOF also has approximately 60 
active members of the community 
serving as volunteer DJs on their 
free time. WVOF has participated 
in Stag Stock, both Bowl-a-thons. 
the Rock & Jock game, the Open 
House, and countless other events. 
WVOF has been involved in many 
aspects of the concerts on campus, 
with responsibilities ranging from 
artist hospitality to providing pre- 
show entertainment and equipment. 



S 



"4il ^ activities 




'M — 


SST'^SS^SS^ — 

;: 88.5 \A/VOF-www.wvof .org :: 


\A/|pDF 


, ';-J;- ^wvoFagS 


W^^W^ fl| 


"-.x^rl-....^ ^m 


-: Fairfield Univer8il;y Radio :: 



79 



c/ubs <& activities 




sir 

i/itbs C"' activities 





(^lee club 



GETTING INVOLVED 




The University Glee Club 
continues the fifty-year musical 
legacy of Fairfield University. This 
mixed chorus of Fairfield University 
numbers over 130 undergraduate 
and graduate singers, and is the 
parent organization for four 
additional choral ensembles: the 
acclaimed Chamber Singers, the 
resident quartet, Sine Nomine 
Singers; the Men's Ensemble; and 
Sweet Harmony. These men and 



women who have embraced the 
choral art sing a wide range of 
repertoire. The choir and its 
conductor have made a serious 
commitment to choral excellence, 
while developing a unique choral 
community, an esprit de corps, which 
has become a hallmark of their 
performances. 



81, 

clubs <& activities 









l^^ii r%if liiiiii ^\^^r H^iK4 












^ 


choral ensembles 

FAIRFIELD EXCELLENCE 












clubs &' activities 




The Fairfield University Paolo VI at the Vatican, the United 
Choirs, under the direction of Carole States Military Academies at 
Ann Maxwell, have presented Annapolis and West Point, and 
concerts in churches, schools, recital Disneyworld. Throughout the years, 
and concert halls throughout Europe, many accolades have been 
singing from Galway to Rome, from extended to their performances with 
Florence to London. They have Connecticut Grand Opera and 
been heard in a number of Orchestra and the Greater 
prestigious concert sites, including Bridgeport Symphony Orchestra. 
Carnegie Hall, the National This year finds the singers 
Cathedral in Washington, D.C., performing concerts in Philadelphia, 
Westminster and Southward New York and in other cities in 
Cathedrals in London, the Aula Connecticut. Fairfield University is 

proud of the work of the Fairfield 
University Glee Club and views the 
Glee Club as most representative of 
the University's commitment to 
excellence. 


1 




"After silence, 
that which comes 
nearest to 
expressing the 
inexpressible is 
music. 

-Aldous 
Huxley 



83 

clubs <& acth'itks 





8^H 

77/|(| cb* activities 





LECTORS AND EUCHARISTIC MINISTERS 



Students have the opportunity to train to become 
Ministers of the Word and Ministers of Eucharist. Each 
Sunday, Lectors and Eucharistic Ministers serve at the 
Masses, enabling them to enhance their spiritual journey and 
reach out to others. Lectors undergo a training program in 
the fall, which culminates with a retreat and induction ceremony. 
Eucharistic Ministers can train in fall or spring with training 
also culminating in a retreat and induction. 





««lB*4l-\ I 





85 

c//ibs (& activities 




Forming ''men and women for others 



99 




,86 

(//(bs C" (ictirities 





campus ministry 

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES 





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87 

tr/^/'j- <& acthities 







commumty sermce 

LENDING A HELPING HAND 




'When you learn, 

teach when you 

get, give. " 

-Maya Angel ou 



''You never know whose life 
you 're changing and when 
they 'II change yours. " 
-Anonymous 



88 

ucadc/f/ics 




U > 1 





academics 



"^"J^ 



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s. o. s. 

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES 




Group picture at the Sharing Our Stories retreat 



,90 

c//ihs C" activities 



At left: Trust 
activites and 
group building 
skills used at 
the retreat 




Having fun and getting a little messy at the S.O.S. 
Christmas party 



91 

clubs O"-' activities 





Above: Group photo at the EM Fall Retreat '01 
Below: EM "Senior Meeting" 







,92 

(//(hs e> activities 



Fr. Mayzik holds a 

Mass during the EM 

Winter retreat 





Eucharistic Ministers Winter Retreat 



93 

clubs (& activities 



94 

i/nbs (& activities 





cheerim and dance 

Fairfield spirit • 




i 



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Below: top L-R: Phil Canada, Jill 
Tattoli, Mark Mawstranzi, Steve 
Acevedo 2nd: Kyleen Cascio, 
Andrea LaMont, Cristie Vasso, Jill 
Ryan, Katie Termine, Teresa Priolo, 
Courtney January 1 st: Kathy Mattal, 
Kristen Baureis (Cpt.), Ginny Moylan 
(Cpt.), Lauren Ferrante, Kristlna 



i 




0.01 X E 11 III U 










95 

c/ubs (& acthities 



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c//^ ^ activities 



urhanplunge 



&global outreach 





**We*re there when you 

need us...,and we make 

some pretty good soup 

too!'' 





97 



clubs GT activities 





humer cleanup 

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES 



F1 



Hunger Cleanup is a program of the National Student 
Campaign against Hunger and Homelessness. The money raised is 
distributed to local programs and grass roots initiatives in Third World 
countries, as well as for raising awareness about hunger and 
homelessness here at home. 



98 

(I libs &- activities 




ii 





Co-Chairs of Hunger Cleanup 




Hunger Cleanup Board '02 



99 

chihs <& acti Vitus 




WlTl 

STAGS IN ACTION 



With moving basketball teams and a hockey team that 
just can't seem to make it back to campus, the true fans will 
follow. For Fairfield athletes it's considered a normal day to 
throw practices, games, and workout sessions on top of regular 
work and commitments. The amazing talent may escape some 
but nevertheless, it's there. And over the course of your time 
here, titles and awards are won, incredible victories are 
celebrated, and those heavy defeats are felt. For most, their 
time on the field, in the water, or on the court may be over at 
the end of their senior year, but what they have learned and 



BY REBECCA YOUNG 

achieved will carry on. To be part of a team fiill of support on 
and off the field can play an integral part in surviving the ins and 
outs of college life. And with each win or loss a players' strength 
and character are gaining in measure. 

To say that athletes at Fairfield are only those sporting 
a jersey, however, is untrue. Most of the students here find 
themselves participating in a sport here and there. On any 
given day the gym is crowded with individuals and groups of 
fi*iends sweating away. Intramural teams have grown very 



popular this past year and on a nice day the quad is never 
without a Frisbee or baseball being thrown around. Either way, 
sports will always be a great stress reliever to the student 
complaining about classes and work and it's always a fun way 
to spend an afternoon with friends. 



101 

sports 



NSTANT . 

replay 



SCOREBOARD 


@Fairmont State 


L 20-13 


Fordham 


L 46-14 


Siena 


W 42-1 3 


@lona 


W 26-21 


Marist 


W27-6 


@ San Diego 


L 38-35 


@ Canisius 


W 63-44 


Duquesne 


L 49-13 


LaSalle 


W27-0 


@ St. Peter's 


L17-7 



mens 




4— > 

on 
> 



FOOTBALL 



The Fairfield University Men's 
football program finished the fall 2001 
season at .500 splitting the 10 game 
^ schedule with a 5-5 record. In MAAC 
< conference action, the Stags of first 
O year head coach Joe Bernard, were 
LL 5-2 with defeats coming at the hand 
w of St. Peter's and league champion 
Duquesne. 

Three Stag gridders were 
named to the MAAC conference first 
team. Junior wide receiver Andrew 
Turk, junior tight end Matt Giugliano 
and freshman punter Jeff Gomulinski 

|1()2 

sports 



earned a spot on the coveted all league 
first squad. 

Turk finished the season with 
team bests in receptions (61), 
receiving yardage (773) and 
touchdowns (9). Giugliano caught 21 
aerials for 21 aerials for 205 yards and 
five touchdowns. Gomulinski 
averaged over 38 yards per punt, 
placed 11 punts inside the opponent's 
20-yard line and had only 4 
touchbacks in 21 kicks. 





1 . The Fairfield Stags prepare to 
make their way to tine endzone 2. 
Senior Sean Kraft keeps the ball 
close to him as he runs up the field 
3. Coach is excited after the Stags 
get a touchdown 4. Senior Mike 
Corello stays alert and anticipates 
the tackle 5. Senior Steve Mirasolo 
in the midst of punting the ball 6. 
Senior Dan Milligan ready for action 




«103 

sports 



104 



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mens 



SOCCER 



MEN'S SOCCER EDGED BY LOYOLA IN MAAC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME 1-0 



Loyola College scored 50 seconds in the 
second overtime enabling the Greyhounds to 
edge Fairfield University in the MAAC men's 
soccer tournament at Lawrenceville, N.J. 
The Stags played most of the game a man short 
as a Stag player was sent off following a second 
yellow card. Stag goalkeeper Roger Noll played 
well in the net making five saves in the first 1 05 
minutes of play. The Stags finished the fall 2001 
campaign with a 11-5-4 record. 

Highlights of the season were the naming 
of seniors Rob DeFaveri and Aaron Kingi to the 
all New England team. DeFaveri finished his 
career as the program's all time leader in career 
goals (22) and career points (59). DeFaveh was 
also named all MAAC and all MAAC academic 
for his performance this season. Kingi started 
all 20 games as a defender. With his 
performance, the Stags' defense allowed only 
17 goals in Fairfield's game. Aaron's naming to 
the all MAAC team made him the only player in 
men's soccer history to earn all MAAC honors 
four times during his stellar career for the Stags. 

Fairfield, ranked among the nation's top 
25 for most of the season, finished its' MAAC 
campaign with a 7-1-1 mark 



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1 . stag goalie shows his 
enthusiasm and involvennent in 
happenings of the game 2. Rob 
DeFaveri keeps his eye on the ball 
as he brings in up the field 3. Senior 
Aaron Kinqi stays in position as he 
watches the action down the field 4. 
Justin Thompson uses his body to 
keep control of the ball S.Adam 



Braz keeps his eye on the ball as 
he kicks it upfield 6, Greg Williams 
keeps posession under pressure 



NSTANT , 
replay 



SCOREBOARD 


@ Brown 


W1-0 


Manhattan 


W4-1 


@ Loyola 


L2-10T 


Canisius 


W8-1 


Niagara 


W8-1 


@Siena 


W1-0 


@Hartwick 


W1-0 


Yale 


W2-1 


@Marist 


W1-0 


@Adelphi 


L2-1 


St. Peter's 


W4-0 


©Harvard 


TO-0 


@Rider 


TO-0 


©Columbia 


TO-0 


lona 


W2-0 


MAAC Championships at 


Lawrenceville New 


Jersey 


Fairfield 2 


Siena 1 


Loyola 1 


Fairfield OT 



.105 

sports 



1 . Erin Porter 

keeps control 

under pressure 



INSTANT, 

replay 



SCOREBOARD 




©Vermont 


W 


2-1 


Buffalo 


W 


1-0 


@URI 


L 


2-1 


©Manhattan 


W 


2-1 


@Canisius 


W 


4-0 


©Niagara 


W 


5-1 


©Brown 


W 


5-2 


Siena 


L 


2-0 


lona 


W 


6-0 


©Yale 


W 


1-0 


© St. Peter's 


W 


11-2 


Marist 


L 


2-1 


Loyola 


W 


1-0 


Pittsburgh 


W 


3-0 


Dartmouth 


L 


4-1 


Rider 


W 


6-1 


MAAC tournament at Orlando Florida 


Rider 


L 


1-0 




3. Stag 
sophomore 
Katie Buckman 
stays in control 
of the ball 



,106 

sports 




women s 

SOCCER 




s^ 



WOMEN'S SOCCER FINISHES FALL 2001 SEASON WITH 13-6 MARK 



The Fairfield University women's soccer team 
finished the season with a 13-6 overall mark, good 
enough for a second place finish in the MAAC 
conference with a 7-2 conference record. The Stags 
were eliminated in the first round of the MAAC 
championships by a 1-0 defeat at the hands of Rider 
College. 

A highlight of the season was the performance 
by senior tri captain Pamela Cluff The second team all 
MAAC selection was hampered by an ankle injury but 
still managed to post six goals and two assists. A two- 
time MAAC player of the year and MAAC rookie of 
the year in 1998, the senior from Kingston 
Massachusetts finished her career with 88 points, third 
best in Stag women's soccer history. She also ranks 
second in goals with 36 and fifth in assists with 1 6. For 
her efforts, Pamela was selected to play in the 
prestigious New England women's intercollegiate 
soccer senior bowl, which was held at MIT in 
December. 



6. Senior 
Pamela Cluff 
gives it her all as 
she kicks the 
ball down toward 
the goal 







4. The girls on 


5. Goalie Dana 


the bench take a 


Comuniello 


short break and 


prepares to 


watch as their 


defend her 


teammates 


territory 


battle for victory 






a: 

UJ 

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to 

CO 

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107 

sports 



women s 

FIELD HOCKEY 

FIELD HOCKEY NCAA TOURNEY DEBUT ENDS WITH 7-1 SETBACK TO 
2^^ RANKED MARYLAND 



This team accomplished something 
other that no other Fairfield University field 
hockey team did. The 2001 edition captured a 
conference championship and advanced to the 
NCAA tournament for the first time ever. 
Unfortunately, the tourney committee sent the 
Stags to College Park, Maryland to face the 
number two-ranked University of Maryland 
Terrapins with the Stags losing in the opening 
round, 7-1. 

The Stags defense kept Maryland off the 
scoreboard for the first 16 minutes but Rachel 
Hiskins finally broke through converting a penalty 
corner for a 1-0 Maryland lead. The Terrapins 
would go on to score 4 more consecutive goals 
until the Stag dynamic duo of Iza Kotowski and 
Alexia Kennedy combined for a perfect two on 
one break with Kennedy passing to Kotowski 
who beat the Maryland goalie for the Stags only 
score. 

Kotowski finishes the season as the 
Stags all time points and goals leader while 
Kennedy holds the school record for career 

uj assists. W~W' 

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The Stags garnered numerous 
individual MAAC honors. Freshman Kiki 
Bruggink became the 2""^ straight Stag to win 
rookie of the year honors while Karen 
Zanleoni was named to the MAAC first team. 
In addition. Alexia Kennedy and Dani Brown 
each earned All-MAAC 2"^ team honors. 

Fairfield finished the year with an 1 1 - 
1 1 record under head coach Jackie Leonard, 
winning four and its last five games to 
advance to the Patriot League tourney and 
the coveted NCAA tournament berth. 



Senior Katie 

Kelleher keeps 

control under 

pressure 





Senior Stag 
Alexia Kennedy 
jumps out of the 
way as Kelleher 
takes a shot on 
goal 



1 



■^•i 



108 

sports 



Seniors Karen 

Zanleoni and 

Melanie Dungo 

give each other 

a high-five after 

a good play 




Freshman 

Lauren Pizzi 

shows good 

defensive skills 

staying with her 

girl 




NSTANT , 

replay 



SCOREBOARD 




@ University of the Pacific 


W 


2-1 


©Stanford 


L 


3-0 


©California 


L 


3-2 


Colgate 


W 


4-1 


@Rutgers 


W 


3-2 


St Joseph's 


L 


2-1 


@Yale 


L 


4-3 


@Rhode Island 


W 


2-1 


Hofstra 


L 


2-1 OT 


©American 


L 


1-0 


Syracuse 


L 


5-0 


Ursinius 


W 


4-3 


@Holy Cross 


L 


5-0 


@Lehigh 


L 


3-1 


Monmouth 


W 


7-1 


Bucknell 


W 


3-2 


@UConn 


L 


6-4 


Lafayette 


W 


5-1 


Patriot League Tourney at Worcester, MA 


Semi Finals 






Fairfield 2 


Lafayette 


Championship 






Fairfield 2 


Holy Cross 1 



Fairfield Stag 
keeps her eye 
on the ball 



109 

sports 



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TENN 

Tennis Teams Garner MAAC All-Academic Honors 

Sophomore Colin Torrance (Clinton, 
NY/Clinton Central) of the Fairfield University 
men's tennis team, and sophomore Andrea 
Suriano (New Rochelle, NY/The Ursuline 

School) of the women's tennis team were 

named to the 2002 Metro Atlantic Athletic 
Conference (MAAC) men's and women's All- 
Academic teams respectively, over the 
weekend at the MAAC Tennis Championships 
at the USTA National Tennis Center, in 
Flushing Meadows, N.Y 

To be eligible for the All-Academic 
team a student athlete must complete two 
semesters at the school, be a significant 
starter or reserve, and hold a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.20 on a 4.0 scale. 

The men's team finished the 2001-02 
MAAC Tournament in sixth place. They beat 
Canisius in a first round match 5-2, but fell to 
eventual MAAC Champion Marist 7-0. 
Fairfield was able to do some damage in the 
consolation rounds, beating Loyola, and fell 
to lona in the 5th/6th place match. 



The Fairfield women made it to the 
finals of the MAAC Tournament making a 
remarkable turnaround under first-year Head 
Coach Jeff Wyshner. The Stags finished the 
2001-02 season with a 10-9 overall record, 
and a 6-3 mark in the MAAC. Last year they 
entered the MAAC Tournament as the 
number-eight seed, but this year they were 
number-three. 

The women's team advanced to the 
finals with a 4-1 win over Siena in the first 
round, followed by a 4-3 win over Niagara in 
the semi-finals, before falling to the two-time 
MAAC Champion Loyola in the finals. 



|110 

sports 





M" -•im.ry - 





HI, 

sports 



Meghan 

Mahaffy 

sets the 

ball for her 

team 



Joanne 
Saunders 

prepares to 

spike the 

ball over the 

net as 

Sarah 

Cashen 

looks on 




womens 

VOLLEYBALL 

WOMEN'S VOLLYBALL FALLS TO PENN STATE IN NCAA TOURNEY 



The Fairfield University's women's volleyball team made a valiant effort but fell 
short in their fifth straight NCAA tournament as the Stags lost to Penn State in the first 
round of tourney action, 3-0. "Penn State has been unbeatable here in the NCAA 
tournament and we were hoping that would change tonight," said Coach Mitch Jacobs. 
"They didn't make mistakes and we made a ton". The Stags finish the 2001 season 
at 1 9-1 3 overall and 8-1 in the MAAC 



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Kelly Sorensen, 
Becky Guess 
and Conny Paul 
celebrate after 
winning a point 





112 

sports 




Carola Stowe 
watches as her 
teammate 
spikes the ball 



INSTANT , 

replay 



SCOREBOARD 


©Northeastern 


W3-2 


@Albany 


W3-0 


©Syracuse 


L3-2 


©Alabama 


L3-1 


©Liberty 


L3-2 


©Xavier 


L3-0 


Central CT 


W3-0 


©UNH 


W3-2 


©Harvard 


W3-0 


UMass 


L3-2 


Yale 


W3-1 


©UConn 


L3-2 


©Texas A&M 


W3-0 


©Brown 


W3-1 


© Rutgers 


L3-1 


© Manhattan 


W3-0 


©St. Peter's 


L3-0 


Dayton 


L3-1 


Loyola 


W3-0 


Rider 


W3-0 


©lona 


W3-1 


©Canisius 


W3-0 


© Niagara 


W3-0 


Siena 


W3-0 


UConn 


L3-2 


Hofstra 


W3-1 


MAAC Championships 


© Loudonville, NY 


Semifinal game 




Fairfield 3 


Siena 


Championship 




Fairfield 3 


St. Peter's 1 


NCAA Championships 


at State College PA 


First round 




Penn State 3 


Fairfield 



Fairfield works together 
and stays on their toes to 
keep the lead 



113 

sports 



N ■-! \ 



Rowers Place Second At MAAC Championships 
Varsity 4 & Pair Finish First At The Event % 

womens 

CREW 



New Rochelle, N.Y. — The women's 
crew team scored 83 points, which was 
good enough for second place at the 
annual Metro Atlantic Athletic 
Conference (MAAC) Rowing 
Championships. The varsity four and 
pair won first-place medals for the 
Stags. Marist won the championship 
with 94 total points. 



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The four finished the race with a time of 
7:52.7, edging second-place Loyola by 
nearly three seconds. Coxswain 
Jessica DeMarco, Erin Schuling, 
Kathleen Bradler, Mary Claire Finnen 
and Christine Dolliver were part of the 
winning Fairfield team. The pair 
crossed the line in 8:56.6, seven-plus 
seconds than runner-up lona. Marina 
Simeone and Jen Akunowicz 
represented Fairfield in the event. 

The varsity eight A placed second 
behind Marist, finishing the race in 
7:11.5. The team included coxswain 
Jessica DeMarco, Erin Schuling, 
Kathleen Bradler, Mary Claire Finnen, 
Laura Shannon, Caitlin Bakum, 
Christine Opiela, Amy Ferguson and 
Leigh Terry. The B boat took fourth place 
in 7:21 .2, behind the efforts of coxswain 
Samantha Lombardi, Meghan Schultz, 
Kristen Handalian, Aimee Wagner, 
Christine Dolliver, Patty Campbell, 
Lauren Brady, Erin Morris and Andrea 
Bazos. 




In junior varsity 4 action, Fairfield A took second 
place (8:11.9), with the B shell placing fourth 
(8:38.5). The A boat was comprised of coxswain 
Stefanie Hennes, Meghan Schultz, Laura 
Shannon, Patty Campbell and Andrea Bazos. 
The B entry consisted of coxswain Jessica 
Demarco, Aimee Wagner, Kristen Handalian, 
Maura O'Connor and Lauren Brady. 

The novice 8 team scored third place in its event 
(7:33.9), behind the efforts of coxswain Katie 
Molteni, Heidi Bentsen, Sarah Bachman, Kate 
Chesny, Lauren Henault, Diana Polzer, Lisa 
Viele, Marjorie Powers and Carolyn 
Stankiewicz. 

In the final event of the day, the Fairfield novice 4 
secured second place with a time of (8:03.7), 
as coxswain Katie Molteni, Heidi Bentsen, 
Lauren Henault, Marjorie Powers and Sarah 
Bachman took to the water. 




114 

sports 



t*< ^ nf^l --'•■*•:■,-• 'ie;:^^^*^- 




115 

sports 



Men Finish Seventh, Women Finish Eighth At MAAC Cross Country Championships 
Mahoney Top Finisher For Men, Chapdelaine Paces The Women 

mens & womeris 

CROSS COUNTRY 



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Riverdale, N.Y. — The men's and 
women's cross country teams competed 
at the MAAC championships, running at 
Van Cortlandt Park last October. The men's 
team finished the day seventh with 198 
points, while the women's squad placed 
eighth with 184 markers. 

Bryan Mahoney placed 34th in the race, 
crossing the line in 27:43.35. Matt 
Cahalane was 36th with a time of 
27:44.82. Dean Cantamessa rounded out 
the Stags' top three, finishing the race in 
28:45.68. 




Katie Chapdelaine paced the women's team 
by finishing 1 3th overall and first on the team 
with a time of 19:45.56. Fairfield's top three 
finishers also included Erin Heslin (24th overall 
- 20:20.31) and Caitlin Feeney (51st - 
21:15.46). 

lona College tied with Manhattan College for 
the men's conference title with 35 points, lona 
College completed the sweep as the women 
won the MAAC championship with 55 points. 



I 



fi?i 

sports 







INSTANT , 

replay 





m 



"It is because of my participation in 
Fairfield University's cross-country 
program tliat I have the friends I have 
and share the memories I share." 

-Matthew Cahalane 



117 

sports 



Senior Guard 
Kyle Walsh aims 
for the basket 
from the free- 
throw line 



INSTANT . 

replay 



SCOREBOARD 




^Harvard 


L 68-62 


@Michigan 


L 88-59 


URI 


L 59-57 


lona 


L 82-78 


DePaul @ MSG 


L 94-90 


St. Francis, NY 


W 75-71 


@UNCW 


L 82-57 


@Canisius 


L 77-69 


^American 


L 68-67 


St. Peter's 


W 95-75 


@Manhattan 


L 88-72 


@Niagara 


L 79-77 


Rider 


W 69-57 


@Iona 


L 90-79 


@Loyola 


W 64-53 


@Marist 


L 93-84 


Niagara 


L 80-77 


Manhattan 


L 73-70 


@St. John's 


L 95-56 


@Rider 


L 73-59 


Siena 


W 79-72 


Charleston So. 


W 70-55 


Marist 


L 76-64 


@Siena 


W 60-57 


Canisius 


W 72-54 


@St. Peter's 


W 93-61 


MAAC Tourney: Albany, NY 




Manhattan 


W 81-74 


S i c n a 


I 83-63 




|118 

sports 




Senior captain 
Sam Spann goes 
for the two point 
shot 



Senior Stag Ajou 
Deng looks for a 
good passing 
opportunity 




mens 

BASKETBALL 



The men's basketball team finished 
the season winning 4 out of the last 5 games 
and shocked Manhattan in the tournament 
quarter finals before losing to MAAC 
champion Siena in the semi-finals. The 
2001/2002 campaign also christened in the 
"new home" of Fairfield basketball as the 
Stags played all home games in the 
magnificent Arena at Harbor Yard in 
downtown Bridgeport, throw line. Seniors 
Sam Spann and Ajou Deng were named to 
the 2nd team all MAAC and sophomore 
Rob Thompson was named to the MAAC 
All-Academic team. Attendance averaged 
over 2,500 per game as the Stags provided 



all conference foes with the opportunity 
to play in the most modern and 
comfortable venue in the league. In terms 
of individual highlights, freshman Den Gai 
was named MAAC defensive player of the 
year. Gai, a two time MAAC rookie of 
the week, averaged 11 .4 points per game, 
a league best 3.96 blocks per game and 
shot over 80% from the free throw line. 
Seniors Sam Spann and Ajou Deng were 
named to the 2nd team all MAAC and 
sophomore Rob Thompson was named 
to the MAAC All-Academic team. 



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119 

sports 



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Urn 

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Stag Freshman 

Cathy Dash 

looks for a free 

player to pass to 



T 



womens 

BASKETBALL 



Women's Hoopsters Competitive All Season 

Despite losing three standouts from the 
2000/2001 NCAA tourney team, the Stags of 
Coach Dianne Nolan played hard all season and 
finished the campaign with an overall mark of 
13-16 and a MAAC record of 8-10. The lady 
hoopsters were led by junior Schrene Isidora who 
was named to the MAAC first team. The 5'11 
forward from New Jersey led the Stags in 
scoring with a 15.8 points per game average 
placing fifth in the league. Schrene was named 
a MAAC player of the week as well as scoring 
23 times in double figures. Senior Megan Light 
finished a stellar career at Fairfield averaging 
over 14 points per game. Fellow senior Amy 
Hurford closed out a fine 4 years at Fairfield 
averaging over 8 points per game and 5.7 
rebounds. Highlights of the season were 
victories over Georgetown in Washington and a 
spectacular overtime come from behind victory 
over Holy Cross. 

Our kids were very competitive. They 
never stopped trying! 

-Coach Dianne Nolan 



Stags Kelsey 

Dewalt and Amy 

Hurford actively 

defend their girls 




1^20 

sports 




To the left, Junior 
Stag Schrene 
Isidora keeps the 
basket in sight 
as she keeps 
the ball away 
from the 
defenders 



On the right, - 
Katie Hammerer ^ 
defends her girl 
while keeping 
the ball in sight 






NSTANT . 

replay 



Katherine Rusie 
keeps in good 
defensive 
position 



Scoreboard 






@UConn(NIT) 


L 


93-50 


Boston College 


L 


74-55 


Harvard 


L 


68-62 


Quinnipiac 


W 


66-61 


©Georgetown 


W 


67-58 


@Penn State 


L 


88-37 


Siena 


L 


59-57 


©Manhattan 


L 


66-64 


@UMKC (LongBeach) 


W 


61-50 


@Long Beach 


L 


83-77 


Holy Cross 


W 


86-81 OT 


@Rider 


W 


70-61 


Marist 


L 


85-71 


@lona 


L 


70-68 


Rider 


W 


82-78 


©Niagara 


W 


77-73 


@Canisius 


W 


92-79 


lona 


W 


71-65 


@Loyola 


L 


90-85 


St Peter's 


L 


62-55 


Loyola 


W 


61-59 


@Marist 


W 


75-68 


@Siena 


L 


94-85 


Niagara 


L 


85-72 


Manhattan 


L 


80-62 


Canisius 


W 


97-71 


@St. Peter's 


L 


77-64 


MAAC Tourney: Albany, NY 




Canisius 


W 


96-92 OT 


Siena 


L 


80-62 



121 



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,122 

sports 



Brendan Foley 

looks for the 

pass from his 

teammates 



mem 

ICE HOCKEY 




Stags Usher In Collegiate Hockey At The Arena! 



The men's ice hockey team opened the new 
Arena at HarborYard in Bridgeport with contests against 
MAAC powers Quinnipiac and Holy Cross. The Stags 
finished the 200 1 /2002 losing to the Crusaders 3-0. In 
the MAAC, the pucksters finished 4- 1 8-2 and were 
6-23-4 overall. 



Above, Brendan 
Foley and Doc 
McCarthy represents 
Fairfield at Harbor 
Yard in Bridgeport 
when the Stags 
played Quinnipiacin 
the new arena 

To the right, 

Casey 

Laflamme 

anticipates the 

pass 



To the right, 

Brendan Foley 

keeps his eyes 

on the puck and 

is ready for a 

pass 






INSTANT, 
replay 



SCOREBOARD 




@Air Force 


L2 


6-1,8-3 


@AIC 


L 


8-3 


Mercyhurst 


L 


1-0 


Canisius 


L 


7-2 


AlC 


L 


4-2 


@Canisius 


T 


4-4 


@Holy Cross 


W, L 


3-2,2-0 


Findlay 


W, L 


5-4, 4-2 


@SacredHeart 


T,L 


1-1,4-3 


St. Nicholas 


L 


3-2 


Mercyhurst 


L2 


3-2, 3-1 


UConn 


L2 


5-1,6-0 


USA Dev 


L 


2-1 


lona 


L2 


5-3, 4-3 


@Bentley 


W, L 


3-1 , 5-4 


@Army 


L2 


7-4, 3-2 


Quinnipiac 


L,T 


6-3, 1-1 



To the far left, 
Fairfield 

celebrates after 
a goal 



Tim Desmarais 
brings the puck 
down the ice 
towards the goal 



123 



INSTANT. 

replay 



2002 Men's Lacrosse Scoreboard 


@ Holy Cross 


W 


14-9 


Perm State 


L 


14-6 


Brovsn 


W 


9-8 


@Har\ard 


L 


10-8 


@Hofstra 


L 


11-8 


Butler 


W 


11-7 


@ Denver 


W 


12-11 


@Air Force 


L 


8-5 


Ohio State 


W 


8-7 


(OT) 






Stony Brook 


W 


10-9 


@Notre Dame 


W 


11-10 


North Carolina L 


15-8 




NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS 





mens 



to claim their first-ever win over the Irish. 
Junior Matt Buecker led the Stags with 
three goals including the game winner, 
while sophomore Garrett Bamann 
added two goals and an assist. 

Senior John Flandina and junior 
Travis Wells tallied three goals each as 
the Irish lost its second straight to fall to 
4-7 overall and 3-1 in the GWLL. 

Notre Dame began its fourth- 
quarter comeback following Buecker's 
goal off of a feed from Troy Bamann 
which put Fairfield up 11-6 with 7:29 
remaining in the contest. Junior Kyle 
Frigon netted his only score on the 
afternoon off an assist from freshman 
Matt Malakoff to pull the Irish to within 
three goals with 5:58 left in the game. 
Flandina tallied his third goal in the game 
at the 4: 1 7 mark and then Wells followed 
with his third score with 3:32 remaining. 

Senior Chad DeBolt won the 
face-off and raced down the field to 
score his first collegiate goal, which 
pulled the Irish to within the final one- 



LACROSSE 



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124 

sports 



NOTRE DAME, Ind. — The Fairfield 
University men's lacrosse team claimed 
the biggest win in program history on 
the road with an 11-10 decision over 
the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. The 
win improves the Stags to 7-4 overall, 
but more importantly closes out their 
Great Western Lacrosse League 
(GWLL) record at 4-1, and clinches 
Fairfield's first-ever league title and 
automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. 
"This was a great day for Fairfield 
lacrosse," said Fairfield Head Coach 
Ted Spencer. "We showed a lot of 
character in holding them off late in the 
game and got a great effort from 
everyone. I'm very excited to be going 
to the NCAA's." 

The Stags held off a four-goal 
Notre Dame rally in the final 5:58 of play 



goal outcome with 3:19 left in 
regulation. Notre Dame had a couple 
of opportunities in the closing minutes, 
butthe Irish committed a couple of costly 
turnovers and Fairfield was able to run 
out the clock. 

The Stags began the game by 
jumping out to an early 2-0 lead on 
goals by Tom Werney and Garrett 
Bamann in the first four minutes of the 
contest. 

Notre Dame answered with 
three consecutive scores as Wells 
netted Notre Dame first goal with 7:12 
remaining off an assist from freshman 
Chris Richez . Sophomore Owen 
Mulford knotted the game at 2-2 off an 
assist from another second-year player, 
Dan Berger. The assist would be 
Berger's lone point of the contest as he 
was held without a goal for the first time 




I .*v 





Top: Senior 
Shaun Graham 
makes a quick 
shot on goal. 

Bottom: Senior 
Marc Torrey 
looks for an 
open player 
while fending 
off the defense. 




this season. Sophomore Matt Howell, 
put the Irish up 3-2 28 seconds following 
Mulford's goal, but Brian Holland tied the 
game at 3-3 with 3:40 remaining in the 
first quarter. 

Notre Dame's offense was shut 
down in the second quarter as the Stags 
held the Irish without a goal. Fairfield 
was able to extend its lead to 6-3 at the 
break as AJ Califano, Joe Beaudet and 
Buecker each scored a goal in the 
second-quarter stanza. 

The Irish struck first in the second 
half on Wells' man-up goal 32 seconds 
into the second half, but the Stags 
answered with back-to-back goals by 
Buecker and Garrett Bamann. 

Flandina cut the lead to 8-5 at 
the 8:42 mark of the second half, 



125 

sports 



mens 

LACROSSE 



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> 



but Troy Bamann put the Stags up by 
four goals with 5:11 remaining in the 
third quarter. Flandina scored his 
second goal of the quarter with 34 
seconds left as Notre Dame trimmed 
the deficit to 9-6. 

Peter Vlahakis tallied what 
would prove to be a critical goal when 
his shot found the back of the net with 



four seconds remaining in the third 
quarter putting the Stags up 10-6 
heading into the final frame. 

C.J. Kemp went the distance in 
goal for Fairfield and made eight stops 
in the contest. Nick Antol played 51 
minutes and had eight saves while 
allowing 10 goals. 




126 

sports 



Above: Senior Rob Scipioni. in the 
clear, sprints dou n the field. At right: 
Senior Brian 1 lolland mshes past an 
attacker. 




. 



127 

sports 



INSTANT, 
replay 



2002 V\ omen's Lacrosse Scoreboard 


(« Holy Cross 


L 


9-8 


Bucknell 


L 


11-6 


Villanova 


W 


15-14 


Hofstra 


L 


16-6 


Boston College L 


12-11 




@Yale 


L 


16-9 


Niagara 


W 


17-5 


Canisius 


W 


18-3 


@Monmouth 


W 


15-11 


@Vermont 


W 


17-6 


@LeMoyne 


W 


9-8 


@Manhattan 


W 


16-5 


@Marist 


W 


15-7 


@Siena 


W 


17-4 


UCorin 


L 


12-10 


(OT) 






MAAC Championship (w, Fairfield 


University 






Semi Finals 






Fairfield 1 5 


Marist 


2 


Championship 






LeMoyne 1 4 


Fairfield 12 


(OT) 







Top: Senior Lauren Uhr 
cradles the ball and she rushes 

down the field. Bottom: 

Senior Megan Uhr looks for a 

free player to pass off to. 



128 




womens 



LACROSSE 



Women's Lacrosse Edged by LeMoyne 14-12 in Overtime MAAC Ciiampionsinip Thriller 
Stags finish 2002 at 10-7 overall. 



Jessica Conahan tallied three 
unanswered second half goals, to help 
Fairfield overcome a four-goal deficit and 
force overtime, but LeMoyne capitalized on 
their opportunities in the final extra frame 
to claim the 2002 MAAC Championship 
14-12. Fairfield who entered the 
Championship as the top seed, finishes the 
season 1 0-7 overall. LeMoyne (1 0-7, 5-1 ) 
advances to this year's NCAA Tournament. 

Amanda Daniels, who led all scores 
with six goals, put LeMoyne on the board 
first with an unassisted goal at 23:40. 
Rookie Jessica Golden answered for 
Fairfield with a pair of goals to take the lead 
2-1. It would be the only lead the Stags 
would hold on the day, as the Dolphins' 
Ashlyn Maguire scored two straight to 
retake the lead 3-2. 

The Stags played catch-up for the 
rest of the afternoon and fell behind by four 
as many as four goals with 1 6:29 to play in 
regulation. At 15:32 Conahan sparked a 
four-goal run with three straight unassisted 
goals to tie the game at nine. Senior MAAC 
Offensive Player of the Year Lauren Uhr 
would score the fourth tally. 

LeMoyne's Maguire retook the lead 
with a goal at 3:25, but Lauren Uhr 
answered for Fairfield to re-knot the game, 
10-10 at 1:39. 



The two teams traded a pair of 
goals in the first overtime period, but 
Daniels and Maguire iced the game for 
LeMoyne with a pair of tallies at 1:05 
and 0:56 of the second overtime. 
Fairfield won the ensuing draw after the 
second goal, and pressured the Dolphin 
defense but could not score. 

Both goalkeepers were 
outstanding. Rookie Monica Janowitz 
made an amazing 20 stops between the 
pipes for the Stags. Her counterpart. 
Brandy Payne was equally as sharp 
making 15 stops for LeMoyne and 
earning the Tournament's Most Valuable 
Player Award. Fairfield was led in 
scoring by Conahan's four goals and 
two assists. Rookie Jessica Golden and 
senior Lauren Uhr each recorded hat 
tricks. LeMoyne was led by Daniel's six 
goals, and Maguire'sfive. 

Seniors Lauren Uhr and Caitlin 
Perry, junior Megan Cunningham, and 
sophomore Jessica Conahan were all 
named to the 2002 MAAC 
Championship All-Tournament Team. 



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129 

sports 




OSSE 



Uhr and Perry Earn 2002 MAAC Women's Lacrosse 
Offensive and Defensive Player ofthe Year and Eight 
Stags selected to All-MAAC teams 

May 2, 2002 

TRUMBULL, Conn: Fairfield University women's 
laxers Lauren Uhr and Caitlin Perry were selected 
the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference's (MAAC) 
Offensive and Defensive Players of the Year it was 
announced tonight at the annual Championship 
banquet held at the Trumbull Mariott Hotel. They join 
six other Stags on the 2002 All-MAAC teams. 

Uhr, the MAAC Pre-Season Player of the 
Year, finished the season third in the conference for 
scoring and first for goals per game with 39 goals 
and seven assists for 46 points in fifteen games. 
She was a two-time MAAC Player of the Week 
selection and also collected 23 ground balls and 
controlled 24 draws. For her efforts, she was also a 
2002 First Team All-MAAC selection. 

Perry, a senior co-captain for the Stags, led 
her team to the best scoring defense in the MAAC, 
allowing just 8.66 goals per game. In 1 5 contests, 
she had 35 ground balls, caused 21 turnovers, and 
controlled 12 draws. Her efforts also landed her a 
spot on the 2002 First team All-MAAC. 



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aports 




Joining Uhr and Perry on the All-MAAC First 
team is sophomore attack Jessica Conahan. A 
three-time MAAC Offensive Player of the Week, 
Conahan led the Stags and finished second in the 
MAAC with 32 goals and 16 assists for 48 points. 
She also collected 35 gb's, had 24 draw controls, 
and caused 1 turnovers. 

Also earning spots on the All-MAAC teams 
were senior Megan Uhr and rookie Monica Janowitz 
who were selected to the second team. Uhr finished 
third in team scoring with 25 goals and five assists 
for 30 points. She also had 21 ground balls and 
eight draw controls. Janowitz, a three-time MAAC 
Defensive Player of the Week selection, led the 
MAAC with her 8.90 goals against average. She 
finished her first collegiate season with an 8-4 overall 
record and turned away 53.5 percent ofthe shots 
she faced. 

Rounding out Fairfield's 2002 All-MAAC 
selections were sophomores Kathleen Crane and 
Lauren DeSteno, junior Megan Main, and senior 
Anne Gormley who each earned spots on the All- 
MAAC Academic squad. In order to be selected 
for this honor, the student athlete must have 
completed at least two semesters at the institution, 
maintained at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point 
average, and play a significant role on her team. 

The Stags, who finished a perfect 6-0 in the 
MAAC and enter the 2002 Championships as the 
top seed, will open the tournament tomorrow 
afternoon when they host Marist College at 1 2 noon. 



Left: Senior Caitlin Perry smiles for 
a photo. Right: Senior Calista 
Corley stays focused as she 
sprints pa.st the defense. 




131 

sports 



Five Stags Named To MAAC All-Academic Baseball Team 
Fairfield leads the way on 34-member team 



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BASEBALL 



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Five Fairfield University baseball players 
were named to the 2002 Metro Atlantic Athletic 
Conference (MAAC) Baseball All-Academic 
Team, as the Conference announced the 34- 
member squad at the MAAC Tournament 
Banquet . 

Junior Jeff Castellano (Staten Island, NY/ 
St. Joseph By The Sea) senior Matt Ciardelli 
(Milford, NH/Bishop Guertin), sophomore Matt 
Coolidge (Sandwich, Mass. /Sandwich), 
sophomore Nick Hudyma (New Britain, Conn./ 
New Britain), and sophomore Matt Young (Berlin, 
Conn. /Berlin) represent Fairfield on the All- 
Academic Team. 

The Stags along with lona College led the 
way with five selections each to the team. To be 
selected to the team, a student athlete must 
complete two semesters at their school, be a 
significant starter or reserve, and a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.20 on a 4.0 scale. 

Castellano and Ciardelli are making their 
second straight appearance on the team. 
Castellano, a Marketing major, hit .249 with 46 
hits, four homeruns, and 23 runs batted in. Also 
the 6-foot junior was second on the team with 
15 stolen bases. 



Ciardelli, a Finance major, hit .305 with 53 hits, 
six homeruns, and 32 RBI. He started 46-of-47 
games for the Stags this past season knocking 
out 1 2 doubles on the year. 

Hudyma, a Chemistry major, became a 
regular in the lineup in the later part of the 
season, starting 26 games for Fairtield this year. 
He hit .233 with 27 hits in 11 6 at-bats. The New 
Britain High grad knocked eight doubles, and 
drove in 12 RBI 

Coolidge and Young saw spot duty on the 
mound for the Stags in 2002. Coolidge, a 
Physics major, was 0-1 in nine appearances in 
relief. Young a Business major was 0-1 in one 
start. 

Fairfield finished the year with a 20-30 
overall record, and a 12-15 mark in the MAAC. 



132 

sports 



Right: Senior shortstop Sean 
Toolan winds up. 







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133 

Sports 




134 

sports 



Above: Senior eaieher Seiiii laslon stands ready for the throw. Top right: 
Senior 1 st baseman Ryan Biltner has his glove ready. 





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BASEBALL 



INSTANT , 

replay 



2002 Men's Baseball Scoreboard 


Notre Dame 


L 


Duquesne 


W 


Florida International 


L 


Lehigh 


L 


Villanova 


L 


Holy Cross 


W2 


Hofstra 


W 


CWPost 


W3 


St John's 


L 


Mahst 


W,L2 


Central CT 


L 


Vermont 


L 


LeMoyne 


L3 


UConn 


L 


Canisius 


W3 


Central CT 


L 


Hartford 


L 


lona 


W,L,W 


Pace 


L 


URI 


L 


Siena 


L3 


UConn 


L 


Yale 


L 


Niagara 


L,W2 


Hofstra 


W 


St Peter's 


L,W2 


Rider 




Manhattan 




MAAC Tourney 





The May 2'^'^ Metro Atlantic 
Athletic Conference (MAAC) baseball 
series with Saint Peter's had special 
significance for the Fairfield University 
baseball team and its extended family. 
Between games of a doubleheader on 
Saturday afternoon, the Stags retired 
the numbers of Mike Andrews, Class 
of 1989, and Bill Micciulli, Class of 



1 993, who were victims of the Attacks 
of September 11. 

Both were pitchers for the 
Stags, and were honored by the 
Fairfield baseball team by wearing a 
patch on their game uniforms, to honor 
the memory of Andrews and Micciulli. 



135 

sports 



Santos, Sarosy Collect All-Northeast Region Honors 
Both Players Selected To First Team 



SOFTBALL 



FAIRFIELD, Conn. — Pitcher 
Mellissa Santos (Pepperell, Mass.) and 
outfielder Ellen Sarosy (Howard Beach, 
N.Y.) both earned a berth on the All- 
Northeast Region team. Santos received 
the award for the second time, while 
Sarosy garnered her first All-Region 
honor. 

Santos set a school standard with 
401 strikeouts in 279.1 innings pitched, 
which currently places her seventh in the 
nation with 10.1 strikeouts per seven 
innings. The junior righthander is also 
ranked for victories, as she earned a 
school-record 27 wins during the 
campaign. Santos posted 13 shutouts, 
and a personal-best 0.95 ERA. She 
picked up the Metro Atlantic Athletic 
Conference (MAAC) Pitcher of the Year 

_i award, and was a member of the All- 

_j 

g MAAC first team. 
I- 

Sarosy enjoyed a record-setting 

season as well, finishing up with a school- 
best 86 hits in 211 at-bats. Her .408 
g batting average rates among the nation's 
^ elite, currently standing 31st in that 
- category. The junior centerfielder also is 
^ listed nationally for stolen bases, 
averaging 



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0.57 stolen bases per game (35 steals 
in 41 attempts). She was one of only three 
players to start all 61 games this season, 
which extended her streak to 1 75 straight 
games played. Sarosy has started each 
and every game since she joined the 
Stags Softball program in 2000. She was 
voted the MAACs Player of the Year, as 
well as a spot on the All-MAAC first team. 
Fairfield Softball, under fifth-year 
head coach Julie Brzezinski, captured the 
MAAC regular-season co-championship 
and received the number one seed in the 
conference tournament. The Stags 
reached the championship game, before 
falling by a 3-2 score to Canisius. 
Fairfield finished the season with a 32- 
27-2 record, its second straight 30-plus 
win season. 



At Right: The team 
comes out to 
congratulate 
sophomore Laura 
Sandonato. 
Far Right: Senior 
Karyn Kennedy runs 
the bases. 



136 

sports 



stags Fall Short In Quest For MAAC Tournament Title 
Kennedy Becomes Ail-Time Leader In RBI 

womeris 

SOFTBALL 



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sports 



AMHERST N.Y. — Karyn 
Kennedy drove home all three Fairfield 
runs but it was not enough for the top- 
seeded Stags Softball team to defeat 
second-seeded and host Canisius 
College. The Golden Griffs posted a 
2-1 win and a 3-2 victory to capture the 
2002 MAAC tournament title, and a 
berth to the NCAA tournament. 

In the opener, Fairfield took a 
1-0 lead when Kennedy lined a two- 
out single to left field. One inning later, 
Canisius tallied a pair of runs on an 
infield single to deep shortstop. 
Pitcher Veronica Maher made the 
lead stand up, and earned the save out 
of the bullpen for Canisius. Mellissa 
Santos was the hard-luck loser, despite 
fanning nine hitters in the game. 




Canisius grabbed a 1-0 lead in 
the second and deciding game of the 
MAAC tournament. But, Kennedy rose 
to the occasion once again. This time, 
the senior laced a double to right-center 
field which scored a pair of runs. The 
RBIs gave Kennedy the school record 
for career RBIs, surpassing Missy 
Powers' standard of 102 set between 
1997-2000. The Stags still held a 2-1 
lead heading into the bottom of the 
seventh, but Canisius was not finished. 
The Griffs plated a pair of runs in the 
inning, the last coming with two outs. 
Both runs were unearned, as an error 
which started the inning set up the 
winning rally. 

Ellen Sarosy, Brie Zimmerman, 
Santos and Kennedy each received 
All-MAAC tournament honors for 
Fairfield. 

The Stags finished the 2002 
season with a 32-27-2 record, and 
were crowned MAAC regular-season 
co-champions with Canisius College. 
Both Fairfield and Canisius posted a 
1 3-3 record during the MAAC regular 
season. 



Junior Ellen Sarosy 
swings away 






Senior catcher 
Katie Caputi 
throws to try and 
make an out 




NST ANT. 
replay 



2002 Women 


's Softball Scoreboard 


@East Caroline Pirate Classic: 




Deleware W, UMBO L, 




Towson L, East Carolina L, 




Delaware W, East Carolina L 


@ Stetson 


L, Villanova L, St Francis L, Holy Cross W, 


Robert Morris L 


@ Lehigh 


L2 


Central CT 


W 


@Wagner 


L 


Yale 


W,L 


@Comell 


L,W 


Dartmouth 


L2 


Stony Brook 


W,L 


@Manhattan 


W2 


@St Peter's 


W,L 


Hartford 


W,T 


@Niagara 


W2 


@Canisius 


L,W 


Providence 


W 


Brown 


L2 


Rider 


W2 


lona 


W,L 


Siena 


W2 


Marist 


W2 


MAAC CHAMPIONSHIPS @ BUFFALO, NY 



Junior Christy Urban pitches, 
looking for a strike 



139 

sports 



mens & womeris 

GOLF 



Men's Golf Finishes 16th at New England 

Division I Golf Tournament 

Novak leads Fairfield in two-day event 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. - The Fairfield University 
men's golf team finished 16th in the New 
England Division I Golf Tournament held at the 
Triggs Memorial Golf Club, in Providence, Rl. 

Christopher Novak finished the two-day 
tournament with scores of 81 on Saturday, and 
82 on Sunday for a 163. 

Mike Gearon shot an 80 on the first day, and a 
86 on Sunday. Sam Lauria posted scores of 91 , 
and 82, and James Turnesa finished with an 82 
and 92 over the two-day event. 



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sports 






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SPORTS 






141 

sports 



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142 

(iiadcwics 





classrooms and beyond 



ACADEMICS 



Dealing with the registrar, praying you get 
the classes you want, tracking down professors to 
get written into those classes, unloading your 
already pitiful bank account for books that you'll 
barely open, and waking up for those dreaded 
classes before noon. And that's just the beginning 
of the academic process. What follows the 
beginning of each semester is a whirlwind of 
missed morning classes, the never-ending turbo, 
and, of course, exams. 

With everything that comes along with 
college life, time seems to fly by and it gets harder 
and harder to remember to fit in studying for all 
those classes somewhere. But when it's II pm 
and you've got a 10 page paper to research and 



BY REBECCA YOUNG 

write with and exam that's 40% of your grade to 
cram for the real meaning of college hits you. So 
it's off to the library to find a corner to smuggle 
your pot of coffee into and start reading. 

And in what seems like no time at all, you're 
back at the bookstore with those still shrink- 
wrapped books standing in line. After unloading 
everything you don't know whether to smile 
because you actually have some money or yell 
because of the amount you actually paid. Either 
way, another year comes to a close... the end of 
your first, or the end of your last. Your 



accomplishments of what's behind you never 
cease to amaze and the promises and goals of 
what lay ahead are countless. If only you knew 
then what you know now! 



-143 

academm 





144 

acadeniics 








>S5 



145 

academics 



II^. * f 





open visions 

ACADEMICS 



Open Visions is an outreach 
program run by Fairfield University's 
Continuing Education program. Open 
Visions is a thought provoking lecture 
series, featuring important figures in the 
worlds of art, film, literature, media and 
politics. 

Dr. Philip I. Eliasoph organized 
the series, which he says, "... celebrates 
the life of the mind. It is designed to 
enlighten and challenge the thinking public 
with speakers that are relevant and 
engaging. These may be today's 
newsmakers but they are tomorrow's 
legends, weaving the patterns of history 
in strange and wonderful ways." 

This year's series featured 
Princess Michael of Kent, the wife of the 



Queen of England's first cousin and also 
a descendant of ancient European 
aristocratic houses on both sides of her 
family. 

Princess Michael has written two 
successful history books that have 
become best-sellers and have been 
translated worldwide. 

Howard Means discussed his 
book Money and Power: The History 
of Business, which covers the story of 
business over the last thousand years 
through the stories of some of the most 
powerful business leaders. 

Jeff Greenfield, a veteran 
journalist and author, as well as co-anchor 
and senior analyst at CNN spoke of the 
United State's political maneuverings. 



146 

cuademics 




Opposite Pa^e: Patricia J. Williams, J.D., 
professor at Columbia University School of Law, 
author, and columnist, spoke in the Regina A. 
Quick Center for the Arts on January 24 as part 
of Fairfield's four-ckiy Martin Luther KingJr 
celebration. Prior to her presentation on January 
24, Williams took time to meet and speak with 
Fairfield University students (and one alumnus) in 
the Quick Center. Pictured above (l-r) are Teresa 
Correa '05, Lauren Cagar '05, Jess Doyle '05, 
Patricia Williams, Andrew Lewis '00, and Jon i 
Saunders '03. 



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At Left: At a business etiquette dinner 
and cocktail party, seniors Rebecca 
Severs and Colleen Reiley practiced 
using their utensils 
European style. 



Below: Senior Jason 
Cummings was among the 
students in attendance who 
discussed race and education 
at an all-day forum held March 
23 in the Charles F. Dolan 
School of Business. 




147 

academics 



At Right: Gerhard Bowering, S.J., 

renowned expert on Islamic studies, 

presented this year s Bellarmine 

Lecture. Opposite Page: Professors 

contemplate Jenish-Christian relations 

with author James Carroll: A near 

sold-out Keller Theatre was the setting 

for a wide-ranging and lively 

discussion of Jewish-Christian 

relations on Fehruan' 19. 





148 

acadi'wics 



Above: Poet laureate Robert Pinsky discusses translation: Pinsky, the nation s poet laureate from 
1997 to 2000 and translator of Dante's "Inferno. " spoke with students in the Thomas A. Walsh 
Gallety on February 27 prior to his Open VISIONS Forum presentation. Pinsky discussed his 
year-long translation process with students in the "Dante " course taught by Maty Ann McDonald 
Carolan, Ph.D. Pictured above with Pinsky are students (l-r) Jonathan Kuglcr '04, Laura Vele 
'05, Jamie Frio '04. and Ryan Zipp '04. 




open visions 

ACADEMICS 







The Open Visions lecture series 
continued with Richard Holbrooke, 
"hailed as a master of impossible 
missions." Holbrooke has the reputation 
of being one of the world's premier 
negotiators since his arrangement of an 
unprecedented agreement bringing the 
United States back into good standing 
with the United Nations. Holbrooke 
defined the art of negotiation in both 
business and diplomatic settings. 

Thomas Krens, the director of the 
Guggenheim Museums worldwide 
discussed " The art Museum of the 2 1 '' 
Century," Krens was described by 
Forbes Magazine as the man who is 
"rewriting the rules of how museums are 
run." 

Robert Pinsky, the 39"^ Poet 
Laureate of the United States discussed 
"Keeping the Humanities Alive Through 



the Written Word." 

His book. The Figured Wheel: 
New and Collected Poems 1 965-95 
was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 
poetry. 

This season of Open Visions was 
concluded by Linda Wertheimer. 
Wertheimer is the host of the National 
Public Radio's "All Things Considered." 

She discussed "Exploring Current 
Issues and Ideas Confronting American 
Society. Wertheimer is a renowned 
political correspondent, who has covered 
every major congressional news story 
since Watergate. Her 20 years of political 
reporting gave the audience a special 
perspective on what's happening in our 
nation's capital. 



149 



academics 




2002 Teacher of the Year 



Katherine Kidd 



Katherine Kidd's fourth grade teacher. Mrs. 
Hanson, made her redo nearly all of her homew ork 
assignments. Not because Kidd's work was poor, but 
because Mrs. Hanson knew that her young pupil was 
capable of more. By encouraging Kidd to work to 
an "internal standard," the fourth grade teacher taught 
Kidd a lesson she has never forgotten. 

Apparently not. This year, Kidd has been selected 
to receive the Teacher of the Year Award by the 
students of Alpha Sigma Nu, the Jesuit National 
Honor Society. Director of the International Studies 
program, Kidd's emphasis on setting high standards 
is what the students fmd so commendable. 

"I was stunned and very pleased," says Kidd, when 
she was notified that she had been named. "As an administrator, 1 didn't think I could even be considered 
for this award." 

She explains that her primary identity is with teaching and working one-on-one with students. 
She encourages her students to set and strive to reach their "internal standards," especially when 
applying for prestigious national scholarships and programs. 

Much of that time is spent revising their personal essays. "Helping students identify a topic 
that they want to spend a year researching is the challenging and fun aspect of the work. But polishing 
is what finally gets the scholarship. It isn't fun, but I tell them that when I pull their essays up on my 
computer screen, there better not be any red or green underlines. If I see red or green, I send it back 
to them and tell them to keep working. They are competing for scholarships and programs with 
students from the top schools in the country. Through the application process they begin to appreciate 
the level at which they will have to work. They have to learn how to think about themselves as 
operating in a much larger universe than the one here." 

Between advising and assisting students applying for national scholarships, Kidd also teaches 
three to four courses a year, something she hopes will always remain a part of her schedule. "In the 
entry level International Studies course [IS 1 0], I set the tone for the major. I tell the students that in 
this program, professors will expect you to do good work, and that the quantity of work is significant." 
Most importantly, she says, she helps students see in a creative way how exciting this major can be. 
I f that weren't enough to keep her - and her students - busy, Kidd also organizes extracuiricular 
activities for International Studies students, such as volunteering at the International Institute working 
with refugees, asylum seekers, and immigrants, and the Model UN group, which was named 2002 
Cultural and Special Interest Club of the Year by Student Services. 

All in all. the International Studies major is much more than a textbook trip around the 
world. "This isn't a major for the faint-hearted. It's a life-style major," she says with a smile. 



150 

(icadeftiics 



striving for excellence 



ACADEMICS 




Alpha Sigma Nu selects the 
Teacher of the Year based on 
classroom effectiveness, availability 
to students, and contribution to the 
University. The winner receives the 
award at the Senior/Faculty Brunch 
during Senior Week and is guest 
speaker at the Alpha Sigma Nu 
induction in the fall. 

After serving as an adjunct 
professor of politics from 1991 to 
1993 at Fairfield University and as 
director of global studies and 
assistant professor of political 
science at Sacred Heart University, 
Kidd returned to Fairfield in 1997 
as the University's first full-time 



director of the International Studies 
Program and assistant professor. 

Kidd earned her bachelor's 
degree in history and German at 
Pacific Lutheran University, a master 
of arts degree in Soviet studies from 
Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in 
international relations from the 
University of Pennsylvania. In 
addition to spending a junior year 
abroad at the University of Vienna, 
she has lived in the Netherlands as 
an American Field Service (AFS) 
student, in Argentina for the Lutheran 
World Federation, and volunteered 
for ecumenical programs in East 
Africa and Central America. 




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151 

academics 




Student Achievement Award 



Kevin Home 



Habitat for Humanity 



Three years ago on an early Saturday 
morning, Kevin went to a workday for 
Fairfield University's Chapter of Habitat for 
Humanity in Bridgeport, unaware that w hat he 
was doing would greatly impact his life. 
Through Habitat, Kevin developed his 
leadership skills, construction knowledge, 
and an appreciation for working with a team. 
When the concrete steps are laid, the doors are up, and the floorboards are secured, Kevin loves 
the sense of accomplishment he feels at the end of the day. "Nothing beats the look on people's 
faces when they walk away from the worksite feeling confident and surprised with themselves 
that they could repair or build a house," Kevin says. 

As the current president of Habitat for Humanity, Kevin has played a significant role in 
increasing the number of student volunteers in the three years the chapter has been on campus. 
The increase in volunteers has been so significant that Kevin has had to turn volunteers away 
when going to certain worksites. Since Kevin has been a part of Habitat for Humanity the 
Fairfield Chapter has worked on twenty-three homes including eight this year alone. Kevin's 
work with Habitat for Humanity has also helped him grow spiritually. "I've always believed that 
you show your love for God and others through your actions," Kevin says, " and Habitat is an 
excellent way for you to do that." The people of Bridgeport and their enormous appreciation for 
life has inspired him to always remain involved with Habitat for Humanity. 

Kevin's day doesn't end there. He is also involved with many other organizations on 
campus and in the community such as MAACS, Headstart Family Literacy Project, Campus 
Ministry, and has been a Resident Advisor and townhouse manager for the past two years. 
Academically, Kevin has achieved membership of Psi Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, and president of 
Alpha Sigma NU. With Dr. John F. McCarthy, a psychology professor at Fairfield, he has co- 
authored three papers for a language research project. 

When asked what Fairfield has meant to him, Kevin replied, " From the administration and 
the faculty 1 learned things you can't teach such as communication, confidence, and working in 
groups. I learned that life isn't always easy and it takes a lot of diligence to get through it. 
Fairfield has provided me with the direction I want my life to take." 



152 



(icadcniia: 



Student Achievement Award 

Amy Hurford 

Burroughs Community Center Tutoring 
Program 




For the past four years Amy Hurford 
has dedicated herself to being a student 
athlete as a member of the women's varsity 
basketball team. In doing so. Amy realized 
that her busy athletic schedule with the team 
made it difficult for her to participate in 
community service projects. Taking matters 
into her own hands, Amy worked out a way 
for the team to volunteer on their one day off. 

While attending the NCAA Foundation Leadership Conference in Florida, Amy was able to develop 
her idea to tutor children at the Burroughs Community Center in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The 
center provides youth programming to students who range in ages from 1 to 14 years old who live 
in the PT Bamum housing project. By spending five days at the conference, Amy acquired the 
necessary skills to put her plan into action. 

The tutoring program has had a positive impact on both the children being tutored as well as 
the entire women's basketball team. Amy says, " The teachers identified the children who needed 
tutoring in a variety of subjects. The children seemed to relate to us because many of the players 
have been featured in the newspaper and some of the kids come to our games." While only four 
players were needed per week, usually six to eight players would end up going. " My teammates 
really supported the program, " says Amy. From a personal perspective, Amy expressed that she 
learned how to be patient and encouraging to these children, and she learned how to interact with 
children who are of all different lifestyles. 

Amy has excelled both on the court as well as in the classroom at Fairfield. She is a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa and won the award for Distinguished Work in the Natural Sciences in 
200 1 . Besides her tutoring program and playing on the basketball team, Amy is a delegate on the 
Student Athletic Advisory Committee, and she is also a member of the Faculty Athletics 
Committee. While reminiscing about her time at Fairfield, Amy says she is glad to have been part 
of this University. " There are many facets of life that I have excelled at while I've been at Fairfield. 
Had I gone somewhere else, I wouldn't have had these experiences." Amy's tutoring program has 
had a ripple effect on many other athletic teams here at Fairfield, thus proving it will continue to be 
successful in the years long after Amy has graduated. 



153 



academics 





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Student Achievement Award 



Emily Sciascia 

Weekend Programming 



"It's been experience after experience, test 
after test. And I have loved every minute of it." 
These thoughts sum up Emily's two years as a 
member of the Weekend Programming Committee 
here at Fairfield University. Emily fondly recalls 
how two summers ago while working in the 
Orientation Team she was encouraged by Steve 
Winkle '01 and Kevin Hayes '01 to interview for the 
vacant Weekend Programming position. From that 
day on Emily has demonstrated the leadership and motivation required for this time-consuming 
position. 

Over the past two years weekend programming at Fairfield University has improved dramatically. 
Emily says the goal is to keep students on campus. The programming board has been offering attractive 
alternatives to students to deter them from leaving campus on the weekends through diverse 
programming that includes campus game shows, live bands at the Levee, and free movie tickets. As a 
result of Emily's efforts with the programming board, attendance at the weekend events here at Fairfield 
University has steadily increased. 

Within her first year of working on Weekend Programming, Emily has taken a position of 
leadership. With only herself and two freshmen working on the board, Emily knew she had to step up 
and take the role of leader as well as teacher. Her enthusiasm and determination have certainly aided 
the programming board in achieving its goals, but Emily's experiences have also impacted her, Emily 
has learned patience, the ability to handle multiple responsibilities, and more importantly to give her all 
to a commitment, even when the awards may appear small. Emily's actions to instill similar leadership 
qualities in freshmen ensure that weekend programming will continue to satisfy the student community 
in the years to come. 

Besides Weekend Programming, Emily has worked on Senior Week, she has an internship in the 
Office of Special Events, and works with the S. K. I.L.L. Initiative Program. Emily is also a member of 
the prestigious "Who's Who in Universities and Colleges" and has been on the Dean's List. 

These experiences will be beneficial to Emily and her future career in event planning, which she 
hopes to pursue after graduation. Emily also promises her future support to Fairfield post-graduation 
when she says, " I'll be back here, 1 know I will." 



.154 

cicadcniics 



Student Achievement Award 



Kristin Yochum 



Debate Team 





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Kristin Yochum got involved in debate 
in high school simply because her brother was 
joining, she never expected it would play such 
an integral part in defining her as a person. 
When Kristin joined Fairfield's debate team 
her fi-eshman year, she felt a change in her 
life. Kristin recalls how she was the "quietest 
girl ever," and now four short years later, as 
Chairperson of the Debate Team, Kristin has 
transformed into " a student leader as well as a 
more outgoing person." 

Unlike many organizations, the Debate Team requires a significant amount of time per week. 
During the fall semester it was not uncommon for Kristin to coordinate the travel arrangements for the 
team when it traveled to different schools almost every weekend to participate in debates, and the 
rigorous schedule slowed down only slightly in the spring. While many people would shy away from 
such a demanding and exhausting schedule, Kristin admits this is what attracted her to the team. 

Kristin says, " The key to continued success for the team is to ensure that the members enjoy 
every minute of it." The Debate team is a lot more than simply practicing and attending debates. To 
encourage a love for the team, Kristin helped form a summer workshop that allowed team members to 
meet and work on speaking, acclimating, and debating. This helped the team bond and get settled at 
school before the actual debate season began. Kristin also implemented a workshop during the school 
year that benefits new members of the team who were unable to attend the summer workshop. The 
primary goal of these workshops was to bring about a cohesiveness and camaraderie among team 
members. Kristin's efforts were rewarded when the Debate Team was the Special Interest Organization 
ofthe Year 2000. 

Kristin's busy schedule does not end with the Debate Team. Kristin is also involved with 
muhicultural relations at Fairfield and was one ofthe people responsible for planning the Martin 
Luther King Jr. Day Celebration that takes place on campus. 

In the future Kristin hopes to attend graduate school and pursue a career in either 
political management or public policy in Washington D.C. " My life was a blank slate, " Kristin 
says, " and Fairfield University gave me the opportunity to create myself." 



155 

academics 




William J. Kramer '60 
Humanitarian Award 

Kathryn O'Connell 



Kathryn O' Connell entered Fairfield 
University as one person, and is now leaving as 
a completely new one. This transformation is 
largely due to her involvement in Mission 
volunteers and her two journeys to Haiti where 
she worked at Project Pierre Toussaint, the 
Homeless Center for Boys at 1 3 Street. '' I 
have seen such poverty in Haiti, but the people 
there are amazing. From them I've realized 

there is a bigger world out there beyond these walls and not to worry about the 
material things because there are more important things to worry about." 

In Haiti, Kathryn taught many children how to read and write. Her trips there 
were challenging and it was difficult seeing the poverty that the people in Haiti face. 
While Kathryn says she may not have made a big impact there, " Seeing those 
children's face after they comprehend addition or something they had struggled with 
is unbelievably rewarding." In the end, Kathryn 's spirituality was stronger than it had 
ever been. She also became emotionally invested in the lives of the children she met 
there. 

Being President of the Campus Ministry Council has allowed her to 
develop her skills as a leader and has given her an opportunity to make changes. 
During her time as President, the Campus Ministry Council created a 5:30 p.m. 
Sunday Mass for students followed by a dinner to promote community building; they 
also recently held a canned food drive for Hunger Homelessness Week. " The 
Campus Ministry Council brings all aspects of Campus Ministry together and they 
are a phenomenal group who are dedicated to what they do," Kathryn says. 

Besides Mission Volunteers and Campus Ministry Council Kathiyn has 
found time to be a Eucharistic Minister, the coordinator of Monday Night Mass, and 
co-chair of Senior Week. She is also involved with Prospect House and the Boys 
and Girls club. Academically, Kathryn is a member of the Politics Honor Society and 
The National Leadership Society. "Through Fairfield I learned that service isn't a 
sacrifice, it is a privilege," says Kathryn, "This University has made me proud of the 
person I have become." 

After graduation Kathryn plans to do a year of service and continue to 
raise the level of awareness and consciousness of situations like those in Haiti. 



156- 

tuadi'wics 




St. Ignatius Loyola Medal 



Amiee Wagner 



"Understanding and appreciating the value of 

friendsliip and developing interpersonal relationships is 
an important to take away from college and into the 
world," says Aimee Wagner. Aimee is a leader of Best 
Buddies, a Campus Ministry sponsored organization 
that matches college students with mentally challenged 
people to forge meaningful friendships. 

When asked how her experiences with her Best 
Buddy, Lisa, have changed her daily life Aimee says " Lisa and I have a special type of 
friendship that has made me come to appreciate the simpler things in life because Lisa 
does. Just coming home to a phone call from Lisa makes me realize the impact I have had 
on her life, and she has had on mine." Aimee sees the face of Jesus in the people she 
encounters with such involvement with mentally challenged people like Lisa; her spirituality 
has been tested and strengthened. 

In the past year, under Aimee 's leadership, the number of people involved in Best 
Buddies has grown considerably. They were able to extend the program beyond the 
Kennedy Center and also to the Best Buddies statewide program. The implementation of 
the Campus Ministry Council has provided Best Buddies with a support system of 
information and ideas. An internet friendship system called E-buddies was also created. 

Aimee is also the varsity women's crew captain. Looking back, Aimee says that one 
of her most memorable experiences was her sophomore year when Fairfield hosted the 
MAAC championships; the team won and Aimee accepted the trophy. Aimee has also 
part of the North American Mission Experience in Kentucky, a mission volunteer in 
Mexico, a camp counselor for Amerikids, a lector for Campus Ministry and a participant in 
the Urban Plunge. Aimee's other awards and honors include: Alpha Sigma Nu, Phi Beta 
Kappa, Fellow Scholar Award, Marguerite F. O'Meara Award, and the Rowing Scholastic 
Athlete Award. 

After graduation Aimee plans to commit a year to service and pursue graduate 
school for a degree in biological developmental research. 



157 



academics 




caj^'ruics 



the good old college try 



ACADEMICS 





159 

academics 




oh! those sweet rewards 

ACADEMICS 




"To laugh often and much; to win 
the respect of intelligent people and 
the affection of children; to earn the ^ 
appreciation of honest critics and 
endure the betrayal of false friends; 





I 



i 



to appreciate beauty, 
to find the best in 
others; to leave the 
world a little better; 
whether by a healthy 
child, a garden patch 
or a redeemed social 
condition; to know 
even one life has 
breathed easier 

because you have 
lived. This is the 
meaning of success." 
-Ralph Waldo 
Emerson 




'L 




161 

academics^ 




162 

smiors 



moving on and looking back 



SENIORS CLASS of 2002 



Freshman year you could have never imagined the 
steps you were about to take, the tasks you would 
accomplish, and how much you would allow yourself to grow 
and change. A mixture of enthusiastic fiiends, loving family, 
dedicated professors, and guiding mentors have all had a 
hand in helping you through those four years. They were 
there to challenge you when you thought it was too difficult 
and to cheer you on till your success. The experiences, 
moments, and memories were never expected but will 
undoubtedly last you a lifetime. 

Now instead of overwhelming anticipation of 
meeting your new roommates, going to classes for the first 
time, or moving into your own beach house, you've moving 
into an even larger world of unexpected happenings. 



BY REBECCA YOUNG 

However, you aren't leaving Fairfield alone. Knowing what 
you are taking away from here and the relationships you have 
made helps to ease those fears and tensions. So when you 
look back on your years at Fairfield know they were truly 
unique and special and they gave you what you need to reach 
any goal. 

"You have brains in your head. 
You have feet in your shoes. 
You can steer yourself 
And direction you choose. 



Congratulations on all of your successes and good luck in 
finging many more. 



You're on your own. And you know what you 
know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where 
to go... 

OH! The places you'll go!" 
-Dr. Sues 



163 



seniors 




164 

union: 




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165 



seniors 



smile and say "cheese 

SENIORS 



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Top (Left to Right): Raquel DaSilva, Larissa 
Figari, Geraldine Perillo, Marianna Valente 
Bottom (Left to Right): Meredith Johnson, Sarah 
Likavec 



166 



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At Right: Keg Races 

2001 down at the beach. 

The "before" photo. 




At Left: "After" photo at the Keg 
Races. Left to Right: Sarah 
Likavek, Caitlin Perry, Kristy 
Golden, Geraldine Perillo, 
Lauren Andrez, Marianne 
Valente, Victoria Hyne, Larissa 
Figari, Meredith Johnson, 
CalistaCorley 




,168 

.unior.< 



wild and crazy 



SENIORS 





169 



seniors 




seniors 




171 



seniors 




"We are the music 
makers and dreamers 
of dreams. ^^ 
'Willy Wonka 



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solars 




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is a lousy way of keeping 
score. ^^ 

-Unknown 



173 



sesnors 




174 

seniors 




dances andformals 




SENIORS 






175 

seniors 




176 



seniors 




remembering it all 



SENIORS 





At Right: Top(Left to Right): Dave Rissin, 

Nick DelEo, Rich DeNicola, Keith 

McKnight, Chad Pudowski. Bottom(Left 

to Right): Danielle Savino, Jilani Baaquie, 

Jenn LaCroix, Lynn Palardy, Mark 

Weldon. 




laughing till we cry 



SENIORS 






179 

seniors 




David A. Abbate 

ManaLrcmcnr 



Steven Ray Acevedo 




Robert L. Alix 
Marketing 



Michael A. Ambrosini 
Politics & Sociology 




Jason Andriotis 
Communications 



Laurie A. Anglin 
Psychology 




Katherine P. Armstrong Katherine Rcgina Aucoin 
hitcrnational Business Nursing 




Amanda Jean Bartolotta 
Psychology 



Kristin Ann Baureis 

( ioninuuiicalioiis 



JacqueUne Beaudet 
Psychology 



Desiree L. Beebe 

English 




Abb ate - 
Beemer 



Angelica Ambruoso 
Nursing 



Lauren Christine Andrea Timothy John Andreula 

Marketing Accounting 




Anthony J. Aulisa 



Economic 



Jerry Joseph Aversano 
Management & Marketing 



Christopher J. Azzara 

Politics 



Jilani R. Baaquie 

English 




Jennifer Lynn Beecher Marissa Kathleen Beemer 



Psychology 



Communications 



Brian Bavosa 
English 




Megan Ann Bell 

(^ommunicarions 



Amanda Bell 



ettrey Albert Bellemare 
Economics 



Loretta Ann Bender 
Info Systems &: Marketing 




|()-Ann '1'. Bonanno Antonella J. Bonvccchio 

Management Nursing 



iMarada Yan Bou Kelly Elizabeth Bowden 

I inance Psychology 



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.VLaria Nova T. Benedicto Kevin Damien Bennett Orville Kadeon Bennett 
International Business Accounting Accounting 




Amanda L. Betz 
International Business 



Andrea-Marie Bialaski Carla Maria Bianclii Elizabeth M. Biscotd 

P-'chology Art Histoty & English Lit. Psychology 





Joseph E Bologna 
Chemistry 



Jodi A. Bolognese 
English & American Studies 




Jocelyn Melody Bowman Stephen J. Boyle | g^ 

English Computer Science ^eiiior^ 




|()hn Mdward Brady 
Marketing 



Laura ii. Brandt 
English 



Christina Mary Brasser 

AccfHinrinLT 



Sean Brennan 



Psvch 



oKiev 




Chrvstal Lauren Brown 



xonomics 



Megan L. Brunovsky 

Management 



Matthew R. Burns 
Finance 



James Butler IV 
Economics 




Lrica Marie (^annata 
Psvchologv 



Andrea C^anonico 
F^nglish 




'^ Brady - 
Carrozza 



Kristin W Brinckerhoff 

Kiielish 



James Robert Britton 
Communications 




Sean C. Brophy 

Ps\'ch()loy-v 




Ctieryl Leigh Cabourg Christopher John Calamera 
Psychology International Studies 




Kevin Michael Callahan Philip P. Caiiada 

English Computer Science 



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Michael R. Capriotti 
Mathematics & Music 



Kathleen E. Caputi 
Economics & Politics 



Lauren ]. Caputi 

Marketing 



Carmelo Carrozza 

Finance 



185 

seniors 




Elizabeth Barrett Chatel 
Communications 



William B. Chin Meredith Ann Chittenden 

Information Systems Biology 



Christina Chu 
Economics 




1^5 Ryan R Colford 
Marketing 



seniors 



Kathleen M. (Collins 
Marketing 




Caruso - 
Conboy 



H alley G. Ceglia 



Amy N. Celleri 
Int. Business & Spanish 



Casey Lynn Charette 

Mathematics 




Jeremy Regan Chua 

International Business 



Matthew T. Ciardelli 
Finance 



jacque Diane Ciarlo 
Biology 



Cheryl Lynn Civitello 
Biology 




Jennifer Kay Collins 
Marketing 



Jennifer Lee Comer 

Nursing 



Dana Comuniello 
Psychology 



Kimberly A. Conboy 
Computer Science 





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MaryLynn Connor 

Communications 



Courtney A. Connors 

Marketing 



Katherine M. Corcoran 
English 



\'alerie L. Cordasco 
Accounting 




Daniel Anthony (^ortese 
Marketing 




(Cynthia T. (^ota 
Psychology 



Todd W Oonin Angela Mary Crowley 

Communications Accounting 




Jason L. (Aimmings Jcnnilcr 11. (Aimmings 



Sarah Quinn (^oughlin 
Spanish 



Sociology & English 



Psychology 





Connor- 
Dalton 



i; Jordan Corlett 
Economics 



Calistajean Corley 
Sociology 




Kealan L. Corrigan 

Marketino- 




MichaelJ. Coughlin 
Marketing 



Laura M. Crawford 
Finance 




Christine M. Cuddy 
Communications 



Bryan J. Cue 

Finance 




Regina M. Cunningham 
Accounting 



Alexis Linda Dabbs 

Nursing 



Asimenia Dadoulis 

English 



Jennifer C. Dalton ion 

Marketing 



semors 




Carla M. Danca 
Chemistn- 


Meggan E. Daniel 
Management 


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sei^rs Ixonomics 



Christopher Paul Dara 
English Writing 



Michael Davidson 
Fxonomics 



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Lauren E. Darcv 

Politics 




Robert DelliBovi 
Communications 



John A. DeAngelis 

English 




Amv X'ictona DeLuca 
I'inancc 




Maria T. DcRuccio 
1 English 



(^hni James DeSena 
Psychology 



)hn-David DesLoges 
Engineering & Math ■ I 




Danca - 
DiAdamo 



Ronald James Darnowski 
Finance 



Patrick John Darts 
Politics 



Raquel C. DaSilva 
Marketing 




Maria Clare DeBlasio 
Mathematics 



Kristen M. Delaney 
English 



Jessica DeLaura 
Modern Langs & Literature 



Nicholas Charles DeLeo 
Economics 




Jessica Marie DeMarco 

Ps\'ch()l()gy 



Diane DeMoura 

Politics 



Richard M. DeNicola 
Economics 



John Denton 
Accounting 




Michael C. Dew 
Accounting 



Christopher J. DiAdamo 
Finance & Info Systems 



Roberto DeFaveri 

Finance 





Gina Alicia DiFusco 

Marketing 




David J. DiMaulo 
English 




Matthew J. Donahue 

Political Science 




Maureen 


E. Dow 


-ning 


Fxonomics & Spanish 


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)ohn M. Donovan 
Politics 



Kelly C^. Douton 

Communications 




Katherine M. Dunleav}' 
I'xonomics 



Sean Easton 
Communications 



Lara M. Eckler 
German & Theatre 



Michael Elefante 
Marketing 




Dietz ■ 

Faller 



rimothy U. DiGiacomo Sarah Elizabeth Dilorio 

Psychology Englisli 



Justin Dillon 



Finace 




Rachel I. DiPerna 
English 



Amy Ivristine DiSpaltro iMmberlv A. DiVincenzo 



Biology 



Communications 



Wary Kathleen Dolan 
Politics 




Joseph Bauer Dreyer Michael Edward Duggan Kenneth R. Dunaj 



Marketing 



fiiston- 



Melanie Dungo 

Communications 




David Ernst 
Communications 



Enrique Escalante 
Information Systems 



Kevin |. E stela 
American Studies 



40 

Laura Faller 
Politics & English 




Sara II. Fannon 
Int. Business & Spanish 



Jacqueline Farinon 
English & Spanish 



Danielle B. Fashano 
hit. Studies & Spanish 



Lindsay Catherine Fatl 
Marketing 




Scott D. IcrgLisun 



Fnglish 



Raqucl rcrnandex 
International Business 



Lauren Elena Ferrante 
Neuroscience & Psvcholotxv 



X'lviane I-erreira 
Information Systems 




(^ourtncN L\nn lirzpatrick 

Business Management 



Doreen Fitzpatrick 



Ps\ch()l()ir\ 



ulieAnne Forman 
Psychology 



Alison AL Fox 

Sociolotrv & (Communication-; 




)ciin\ AlKn I'rvcr 
Accounting 



Michael R Galvni 
Politics 




Fannon - 
Giangrande 



Adam M. Favale 

Finance 



Kathleen Ann Feeney 

Marketing 




Kristin P. Gardner 
Psychology 



Kevin C. Feig 

Accounting 




Larissa M. Figari 

Mathematics 



James Michael Finnegan 
Economics 




Jennifer E. Franzese 

Political Science 



Timothy Gillen French 

Business 




James Gardner 

Psychology 



Kathryn Marie Garibaldi 
Biology 



Keri E. Giangrande 

Sociology 




Matthew ). Ciirgcnri 
Biology 



Ivristin Mane Giulietti 
linance 



IvL-ist)- Megan Golden 
Inrcrnational Studies 



Jessica Ann Gonsalves 



Accounting 




Sarah R. Grady 
Communications 



Shaun Graham 
Communications 



Michael A. Grappone 
Mathematics 



Katherine Ann Grasso 
English 





d^k 




John T. Griek 



Imancc 



Douglas W. Grifhn 
I'inancc & hifo Svstcms 



Sarah Marie Griswold 
Biologv 



Amy Leah Grunrhcr 
Ps\'rl"i'>!< 




Michelle Mehri 1 iaghpanah 
Biology & (j)ni]iutcr Science 



lames M. Hall 

linance 





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Timothy R. Goss 
Finance 



Leann Gould 

Accounting 



Girgenti 
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Stephen Douglas Green 
Political Science 




Jennifer Ann Guarino 



Michael Guarriello Victoria Ann Guida 

Marketing .Xiathcmatics 




Patricia A. Hamel 
Art Histon,' & English 



Krisen Handalian 

Spanish 



Kelly O. Harner 

Psychology 



Jeannine Harp 
Management 




Christine M. Harrington 
Inr. Srudics & Spanish 



Mervl Haslach 
F.nijlish 



Elizabeth \'. Hasten 
Political Science 



Kellv A. Hennessv 
Sociology 




Caroivn A. Hronis 
Inrcrnarional Srudics 



C^oUeen M. Hughes 

Nur^in;:: 




Brian \'incent irrera 
Marketing 



Dana B. Jacobs 
I'jiglish 



(Catherine lagod/inski 
Stiitiio .\rts 



Jennifer I.. )aksina 
("ommunicarions 



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Harrington 
Jankowski 



Bridget T. Hennessey 
Politics & Sociology 



Kathryn B. Hennessy 
American Studies 



Cadierine A. Henry 

llisrorv 




Audrey Marie Hincman 



Rafael Holguin Stephanie A. Holland 

Business Management Marketing & Communications 



Kevin Michael Home 

Psvchologv & Philosophy 




Elizabeth Mary Hurley Sasha Ann Hatchings 

Psychology Psychology & Religious Studies 



Lauren liuxta 
Politics 



Victoria Lynn Hynes 
Ps\xhologv 




Jonathan janik 
Marketing 



Jamie Jankowski 

Marketing 




Craig January Elizabeth Ann J ehle Sarah A. Johnson 

Markcring Marketing An HiMory 



Macghan O. Keane Kathrxn A. Kellehcr 

Accounting English 



Elaine M. Kelly 
Marketing 



Marlenc O. Lachcr 
International Business 



X'lctona Ann l.actjua 
Ps\ch()logv 



ennifer LaC^roix 
nglish & l.clucation 



Meredith L. Johnson 
Communications 




Matthew J. Kelly 
Marketing 




Patricia Ann I.ahiff 
Political Science 




January 
Lane 



Swati joshi 
Biology 



Jessica Kapoor 
Marketing 



Eric R. Kaul 
Accounting 




Mary Kathleen Kelly 
Marketing 




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Izabella Kotowski 



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Ivimberly Ann Ivriksciun 



Daniel C. Krines 

Marketing 



Michael D. Kenncch 

Mathematics 




)ill M. LaBanca 

Bi()l()e\ 




David R. Lamattina 

Business Management 



Kevin Patrick Lamoin Ciriaco Antonio Landolfi 
Marketing Biology 



Andrew John Lane 

Management 




James |. LaPlaca 

Information Svstems 



Catherine C. Larocque Anthony Laurenzo 

Accounting Marketing 



Melanie ). Lauridsen 
Marketing 

fA 




Stefania Lombardi 
Politics & Ix'onomics 



Jeffrey M. Lombardy 
I'xonomics 



Megan R. I.onegan 
Studio ,\rf & Markcrinir 



Megan Jameson Long 

Information S\stcms 




Alison M. Lucibello 
Nursing 



Samuel John Lauria III 
Information Systems 



Julia Lyons 
Marketing 



Marissa A. MacDonald 
Computer Science 




LaPlaca - 
Maguire 



Michael R. Lenkowski 

Accounting 



Mary Leon 

Markcrino; 



Patricia Li 

Ps\"ch()logy 




Lelani Loder 
Psychology 



Lindsay Marie Loderstedt 
Communications 



Stephen T. Loester 
Management 



Jenniter Logan 
Marketing 




Matthew C. Loonam David Michael Lopez 



Lisa M. Lopresti 



Marketing 



Mnance 



BioloLH' 



Erik |. Lowe 

Management & Marketing 




Alison Beth MacDonald 
Finance 



Stephanie Macinski 
Religious Studies 



Lauren Mack 

English 



Cristina Salvo Maguire 
Finance & Spanish 




II 






Tracy Elizabeth Mallck 
Hnglish 



Andrea M. Mallov 
(Communications 



Jessica A. Marcell 
Psvchologv 



Danielle Marie Marchetta 
Marketing 





(.aria Mane Massari 
Xeuroscience 



Marisa J. Mastriocovo 
Mathematics 



Christian Matarese 
Economics 



Katliryn Ann Mattal 
Markcrinj 




Charles Joseph Mazzone 
(Communications 



Maureen B. McAhster 

Marketing 



Michael P. McCarrhv 
linance 



Catherine loan McCart}' 
Accounting: 




Alexandra (^. Mciiale 
(Communications 



Paul N. McKcnna 
Management 



K\an M. Mcis-cnne} 
Management & Marketing 



laicn I-.. McKinnev 
(Communications 




Mallek - 
McNicholas 



Caitlin D. Marino 
Psvchology 



James L. Marsiello 

Marketing 




Keith Patrick McKnight Enn C. McMahon 
Computer Science Marketing 



Kimberly E. Martin 
Psychology 




Amy Marie Mattulina Courtney Ruth Maxwell 

Theatre English 




James McCourt 
Fxonomics 



Isjmberly McDermott 

Bioloav 




Kathleen M. McManus 
Biology 



Jeannette McNicholas 
English 




w .V 

Ivristin M. Mindo 
International Studies 



Icanine Ann Minutoli 
Communications 



Lisa Ann Mirabella 
Marketing 



Greeorv Arthur Mizc 



-to 



Marketing 




Danicla Morena 
Internatif nu! Business 



Sheila A. Morrissey 
Politics 



Allison li,lizabcrh Morrow 
P^\ chologv 



lusrinc Ann Mosko 
International Business 




Kathcrinc Ann Mullancv 
English 



I'j-in \-.. Mullov 
Accounting 



Rachel I^. Minphy 



Biolot:\ 



Stephen P. Musanre 
Accounting 




Meehan 
- Nelling 



Rachel L. Messier 

History 



Beth Meszaros 

I'.ntilish 



Gerard F. Miles, Jr. 



I'i nance 




Jill Moffett 
English &: Studio Arts 



Allison T. Moonan 
Communications 



Kathleen M. Mooney 
Theatre & English 



Catherine M. Moran 
Biology 




Kathryn M. Myers 

Politics 



AU R. Nasiri 
Biology 



Danielle Marisa NataH 
Computer Science 



Francis E. Nelling 
Communications 




Tama M. Nemaric xMarthew John Nespoli )()hn D. Neuberger Amy A. Neumaver 

Marketing Ijiglish American Studies Xursing 




KarliiMi M. ( )'(>)nncll 



Megan Jennifer O'Leary 
Psychology 



Mary O'Connor 
English 



Micacla O'C^onnor 
(Communications &: Politics 



Richard O'Connor 
Pinance 




James I'. O'Leary 

(Communicanons 



Christopher A. Ors/ulak And Leigh Ostrowsky 
Accounting Biology 




Nemaric 
-Park 



Meghan Eileen Newman Trang Kim Nguyen 
International Business English Literature 



Bryan Gary Nimer 



Finance 




Bridget M. Nunan 
Accounting 



Jessica Lee Oberdorf 
Psychology 



Fiona O'Boyle 

Nursing 



Lindsey Ann O'Brien 
Psychology 





Kevin James O'Donnell Michael F. O'Donovan 
Finance Philosophy 





Patrick R. Palaka 
Software Engineering 



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Justin Peter Palamara 
Management 



Lynn Michelle Palardy 
PoUtics 



Michael Park 209 



Finance 



seniors 




Katey ]>ee Pillard 
linancc 



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Richard E. Pinto 

\'isual y\rts & Psychology 



Patrick Pleshaw 

Politics 



Nicole A. Poirier 



hston 




Matthew Powers 
(ionijiutcr Science 



[enniter \\. Presti 
(Communications 



Anthony Prezioso, Jr. 
Marketing 




Panetta 



Rafferty 



I Nancy Grace Pecoraro Morgan Blair Peddicord 
■ American Studies Nursing 



Teresa Perez 
American Studies 




Melissa M. Peterson 

Nursing 



Joseph T. Piagendni 
Politics & Religious Studies 



Regina Beth Picciano 
Nursing 



Michael James Pickering 
Economics 




Annette Poliwka 

Communications 



Erin K. Porter 

F.niilish 



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John James Pulaski 
Finance 



Laura J. Rabacs 
Sociology 



Melissa Rafael 

Nursing 



Kathryn B. Raffert}^ 
International Studies 




C^athcrinc li,. Renehan 

Polirics 



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Christina M. Reid 

Nursine 




X'incent Ragosta 
Accounting 




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Biology 



Daniel Reid 
English & Fxonomics 




Anya N. Richard 

Rn-lisli 



Brian \i. Rio 

Mathematics 




Sarah Haddcn Robinson 
Marketing 



Robert (I. Rocco 
Marketing 



Alisyn Nicole Rogers Mariclcna Gesualdo Roig 
Politics English 






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Ragosta 



Rouette 



Brian James Rath 
English 



Stacey Ann Rebello 
Biology 



Brooke Redevoff 




Jason Paul Reska 
Finance 



Colleen J. Reiley 
Communications 



Brendan L. Reilly 
Int. Studies & Spanish 




David Michael Rissin 
Che mi sty 



Robert J. Rimassa 

Accountino- 



Joseph Roberts III 
Economics 



Andrew Robertson 

Communications 







Lauren A. Rotondaro 
Economics 



Amanda L. Rouette 

Sociology 




Lisa Maria Runco 
Biologv 



Caitlin Anne Russell Colleen Marie Ryan Idalia Eugenia Rvchlik 



C^ommuncations 



Marketing 



English 




Elizabeth A. Saska 
Nursing 



Sharyn Beth Sattelmair Danielle Suzanne Savino 
Psychology Mnance 



Saveda Sayed 

Computer Science 



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Marv Lvnn Schettini 



Elizabeth Ann Schick 

Nursing 



Isjristen M. Schultz 
Politics 



Emily A. Sciascia 
Communications 




Jane I',. Searson 
Marketing 



inn Cirace Sellek 
Psychology 




Runco - 
Severs 



i Christopher E. Salvatore 



Finance 



Stacy Ann Samperi 
Physics 



Catherine S. Santora 

Studif) Arts 




Sarah E. Scales 
Studio Arts 



Alison Boyd Scanlan 

English 



Caitlin E. Scanlon 
Communications 



Cristina Louise Scarpa 
Sociology 





Michael C. Scolamiero 

Management 



Matthew M. Scott 

Economics 



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Communications 



Beth Ann Semeraro 
English 



Nancy S. Sequeira 
Mathematics 



Rebecca A. Severs 215 
Communications ftv/Zo/'j- 




Jill Nicole Sottosanti 
Psychology 



Julie R. Sowinski 
Music & Management 



Heather R. Spaide 
English 



vVndrew H. Storev 



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Communications 



Keith E. Stefanczyk 
Finance 




Jason Strohmaier 



I'inance 




Karen Ann Trangucci 
Ps\ch()l()gy & 1 Tcnch 



Danielle Lori Torio 

I'.nglish 




Sheehan 



Toomey 



John Skinner 
Accounting 



Deirdre Watson Slater 
English 



Kathleen M. Swider 
Economics & Spanish 




Dara Lianne Such 
Int. Studies & French 



Kevin Sullivan 
English & Spanish 



Jay J. Tuminaro 

AccountinfT 



Suzanne M. Troy 
Biology 




Arzoo Toor 
Economics 



Maureen M. Toomey 
Psychology 




\'irginia A. Tonning 

Marketing 



Michelle Tomec 

Accounrinsi 



Gregory A. Thompson 
Math & Computer Science 



Jonathan M. Thomas 
Information Svstems 




Raymond A. X'lggiano 
International Business 



Susan M. Vendetti 

PsvcholoLTV 




I Elizabeth A. Wilson 
Nursing 



Daniel \\ illiamson 
Communications 




Patrick Hughes Urban 
Marketing 




Cara A. X'eale 
Rntrlish 



1 Elizabeth Mary \'anc/a 
Biologv 





Tonning 
- White 



James Michael Testa 

Accountin 



Leigh Ann Terry 
Smdio Art & Art Histor)- 



Christine Catherine Tarulli 

Communications 




Merry Uk 
Computer Science 



Megan Uhr 
Marketing & Info. Systems 



Lauren Uhr 

Marketing 



Suzanne Marie Vinegra 
Marketing 




Tracy L\'nn \'an Houten 
Marketing & Accounting 



Marianne T Vaiente 
Management 




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Pamela Wishart 

Accounting 




I Tami M. Wichowski 

English 



Lisa Marie Whitman 

Neuroscience & Music 



Jason E. White 
English 



Andrew T. Wliite 219 
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Angela Weston 

Spanish <5^ ( j)mp Science 



Rlizabeth L. Wenger 
English 



Mark A. Weldon 
Politics 



Francis Washkuch 




Jaimie Wallace 
English 



Angela M. Xistris 



English 



Ivristin Anne Yochum 
Poltics & Communications 



Kevin Patrick \'oung 
Psychology & Poli Sci 




(Jorinne A. Zimardo 

f'ommunications 



Stephen iienry Ziomek 
rommunicarions 



Laura Zogby 

Marketing 



Michael J, Zielinski 






Weston 



Zielinski 



Ryan A. Washington James Michael Walsh, Jr. 

Marketing Acc«.unriim 



Edward J. Walsh 
Histoty & Theatre 




Lisa M. Zaccagnino 
Communications 



Gregory R. Zacholl 
Accounting 



Karen Zanleoni 
Sociology 



Justin John Zelek 
English 






j esuit senior social 



SENIOR WEEK 



JESUIT SENIOR SOCIAL KICKS OFF SENIOR WEEK 2002 



Even the threat of rain couldn't 
dampen the spirit of the class of 2002 as 
seniors opened up their final week on 
campus with a social gathering with 
members of the Jesuit community in the 
Barone Campus Center Oak. Room on 
Tuesday May 14"\ Despite decreasing 
numbers, it is still very evident of the 
impact that these "men of Ignatius" have 
had on our classmates. Just listen to the 
words of senior students and how they 
feel about the Jesuits who have impacted 
their stay at Fairfield. . . 



''Greg Grovenburgg SJ has 
been a role model to me. He's so 
dedicated, athletic and it doesn V hurt 
that he 's so cute! " 

"Fr. Tom Regan SJ and Fr 
Jim Bowler SJ have been fun to be 
around and they are great listeners. 
They wish to build a community built 
on respect for one another and they 
will do just about anything for a 
Fairfield student. " 

"Fr Elder SJ is a fun person 
who has a neat sense of humor. " 

"Fr O'Neil SJ was the first 
person I met on campus and he's 
always been there for me. He really 
cares about all students, especially 
the internationals. " 




222 



umors 





"Fr. Jim Mayzik SJ is more 
tJian the media center or the Ham 
Channel... he's a priest who cares 
about us, who cries with us and 
laughs with us. " 



223 



seniors 




"APR is the best and he really is 
a funny man. I wish more people 
had the chance to get to know 
him because he loves this place. " 




224 



seniors 




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SENIOR WEEK 



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''Don y run through life so fast that you 
forget not only where you ve been but also 
where you 're going. Life is not a race, but 
a journey to be savored each step of the 
way. 




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day go by without a laugh. " 
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SENIOR WEEK 




''Take time to thank those 
who have helped you 
through it alL..,without 
them life would have no 

joy " 

-Anonymous 




228 

sellers 





229 i 



semors 



mohegan sun 



SENIOR WEEK 





''You never know when 
you 're making a memory. " 
-Rickie Lee Jones 



230 



Sinters 





232 

seniors 



senior brunch 

SENIOR WEEK 





seniors 






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The class of 2002's 
Baccalaureate Mass was moved to 
Alumni Hall due to wet grounds on 
Bellarmine Lawn. Members of the Jesuit 
Community joined Rev. Aloysius Kelley, 
SJ, the principal celebrant, in celebrating 
the last Eucharistic Celebration for seniors 
and their two thousand parents, family & 
guests. Rev. Paul Carrier, SJ, University 
Chaplin, gave the homily, which reflected 
on four special years on campus. 

"Slowly, almost imperceptibly, 
Fairfield has become as familiar and 
inviting as your own backyard, a 




place where you weren 'tafiaid, a place 
where you were fiee to be yourself , to 
laugh and to cry, to embrace and to 
dance, to sleep late, to dream quietly, 
to listen to music and simply to be with 
friends. 

You have come to learn that at 
Fairfield, there is always a circle of 
hands open to receive you; it is a place 
where eyes light up when you 
approach, where arms hold you when 
you falter. Here you have experienced 
a circle of healing, a circle of friends, 
a circle of life! 

Before you leave this campus 
to which you have brought and 
contributed so much, take the time to 
thank parents, family and friends, all 
the people who make you feel at home, 
who believe in you, the people whose 
faces are like the North Star, steady 
and sure and full of light. Don't miss 
the moment, let the truth be told. " 

Rev. Paul E. Carrier, SJ 
University Chaplin 





235 



seniors 





baccalaureate mass 



SENIOR WEEK 



236 



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238 




commencemnent 

SENIOR WEEK 



Just 10 years after 
graduating from Fairfield University, 
Doug Perlitz returned as the 
commencement speaker, telling 
1,225 graduating seniors how 
Fairfield had changed his life. He 
came to Fairfield in 1 988, "so I could 
be the next voice of my beloved 
Denver Broncos," he said. Instead, 
what he learned at Fairfield led him 
to establish a school and home for 
street kids in Haiti. "The self that I 
thought I was, became different from 
the self that I became," he explained. 



It was his Fairfield education, 
he said, that led him to try to fulfill 
the dream of Wilnaud, "a nine-year- 
old street boy, a soulless one as they 
are called in Haiti, who asked me 
simply, 'Doug, will you send me to 
school someday? I have always 
wanted to go.'" That encounter 
changed the direction of Doug's life 
and resulted in the Pierre Toussaint 
School and Outreach Program for 
Street Children in the northeast Haiti 
town of Cap Haitien, where he 
continues to work. 




1 



se^rs 





He urged the new 
graduates to listen to Fairfield's 
message to "offer all you are, 
your whole heart and mind and 
soul to those you meet on your 
way - especially those who have 
no way." Life, he noted, is not full 
of complex questions, but simple 
responses: "Yes or no, go or stay 
help or not help. Don't 
complicate life's simple beauty 
with debilitating analysis and 
clutter," he said. "Always listen for 
that Fairfield voice: 'Have 
courage my friend, believe in 
yourself, and move on.'" 



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240 





commencement 

SENIOR WEEK 




Fairfield University conferred 
an honorary doctor of laws degree 
on Doug Perlitz as well as Loretta 
Brennan Glucksman, chairman of 
The American Ireland Fund that 
supports educational, cultural and 
public service projects in Ireland, and 
the Rev. George W. Bur, S.J., 
president of the Gesu School in 
Philadelphia that serves inner-city 
children; and an honorary doctor of 
science degree on John P. Sachs, 
Ph.D., of New Canaan, Conn, a 
former trustee of Fairfield University 
and former president and CEO of 
Great Lakes Carbon Corporation. 

Martin J. Dempsey of 
Ansonia, Conn., delivered the 
valedictory address. He told his 
classmates, "In the tragic events of 
September 11 we were forced to 
look beyond the problems and 
circumstances of our own lives and 
recognize our personal problems 
are often trivial in light of the greater 
problems that exist in the world." He 
challenged them to "take a moment 



to step back and evaluate your 
situation. Never take for granted the 
simple things in life because they will 
not always be there." 

Rev. Aloysius P. Kelley, S. J., 
university president, presented the 
Saint Ignatius Loyola Medal for 
outstanding university service to 
Aimee V. Wagner of Mahwah, N.J., 
and the Bellarmine Medal for the 
highest four-year academic 
average to Brett J. Yacoviello of 
Trumbull, Conn. 




241 



seniors 






''The highest reward for a person s toil is not 
what he gets from it, but what he becomes by it. " 
-unknown 




''Do not fear to step into 
the unknown, for where 
there is risk, there is also 
reward. " -Lori Hard 



242 

seniors 




'7/ is difficult to say what is 
impossible, for the dream of 
yesterday is the hope of today and 
the reality of tomorrow. " 
-Robert H. Goddard 



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244. 



seniors 



Congratulations 

to our newest alumni - 

"Students for four years, ALUMNI for life! 



99 



Remember to keep in touch with us so we can keep in touch with you. 
If you movCf change jobs or get married and change names, 

be sure to let us know. 

You can reach us in many ways: 

Visit 

Alumni Relations 

Alumni House 
Fairfield University 
Fairfield, CT 06430 

Call 

(203) 254-4280 

Email 

fualumni@mail.fairfleld.edu 

Website 

www.fairfield.edu 

Fax 

(203)254-4104 

We, the Alumni Association^ wish you all the best 
and hope to see you soon! 




245 



ConQmtiiiations to 
the Class of 2002 
and the hope ojf Kiew 
and exckiha horizons 
jor b^^rpreams iKitke 

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246 

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FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY/FAIRFIELD, GT 06430 



ABBEY TENT & 
PARTY RENTALS 



IS PROUD TO SUPPORT 



FAIRFIELD 
UNIVERSITY'S 
CLASS OF 2002 



AND WOULD LIKE TO 



CONGRATULATE ALL GRADUATES! 



247 

(ids 



Together, 

anything is possible. 

At Fleet, we know that It takes the hard 
work of many special individuals and groups 
to nurture a community Which is why we 
would like to take this opportunity to applaud 
the efforts of Fairfield University for their 
outstanding contributions to the community 



Fleet 



Member FDIC. Fleet is a registered inar1< of FleetBoston Financial Corporation. ©2001 FleetBoston Financial Corporation, All rights reserved 



248 

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Quick & Reilly 

A FteetBoston Financial Company 



IS PROUD TO SUPPORT 



FAIRFIELD 
UNIVERSITY'S 
CLASS OF 2002 



AND WOULD LIKE TO 



CONGRATULATE ALL GRADUATES! 



249 i 

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GRADUATES OF 

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2002 




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Class of 2002 

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251 

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252 

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253 

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CONGRATULATIONS 

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255 

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